Dandruff - Prescriptions

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Did you see a doctor for your dandruff? What was prescribed, and was it effective?

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If over-the-counter products don't work, what can the doctor prescribe for dandruff?

Your primary care physician or dermatologist can recommend prescription-strength shampoos or antifungal and corticosteroid creams that are stronger than those available over the counter, yet are not too strong to use on the face. There also are corticosteroid-based liquids, gels, and foams that you can apply to the scalp that won't leave your hair limp and matted. Non-steroid preparations like tacrolimus (Protopic) or pimecrolimus (Elidel) can also help.

As with all seborrhea (dandruff) treatments, medicated shampoos and cortisone creams calm down your skin or scalp sensitivity, but they can't stop the seborrhea (dandruff) from coming back. Most people, however, only have to treat their condition from time to time when it becomes itchy or noticeable.

A word on eyelashes

Dandruff (seborrhea) of the eyelashes can be both annoying and hard to treat. Eye doctors like to recommend scrubbing the lashes with baby shampoo on a cotton swab. Corticosteroid-based lotions should be used close to the eye only under medical supervision since continuous exposure of the eye to these products can lead to serious eye problems.

Return to Dandruff (Seborrhea)

See what others are saying

Comment from: Cruiser, 75 or over Male (Patient) Published: November 07

I have had a seasonal dandruff problem for many years. It usually starts in the late fall and continues through until spring. My doctor gives me a prescription for Ratio-Ectosone Scalp Lotion 0.1% (Betamethasone 17-valerate) and it really does the job.

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