Knee Bursitis - Experience

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Does your job cause trauma to your knees? Share your experience with knee bursitis.

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What is knee bursitis?

The knee joint is surrounded by three major bursae. At the tip of the knee, over the kneecap bone, is the prepatellar bursa. This bursa can become inflamed (prepatellar bursitis) from direct trauma to the front of the knee. This commonly occurs when maintaining a prolonged kneeling position. It has been referred to as "housemaid's knee," "roofer's knee," and "carpet layer's knee," based on the patient's associated occupational histories.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: christi, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 06

I am a 51 and have had bursitis for a year. I fell about a year ago. I have iced it and raised it, but this does not help. I don't know what to do. It is bigger than my left knee and is swollen and red.

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Comment from: danatboise, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: December 13

I recently was diagnosed by my VA (Veteran Affairs) doctor to have anserine bursitis of the right knee. I have a lot of pain in both legs and feet because of permanent damage to the nerves in my back from degenerative arthritis, so at first, I thought it was related. Then, I realized this was different because it also hurts to touch it, and is extremely painful to walk on. The doctor says to take 400 mg. 4 times per day, avoid crossing legs, and bending, put a pillow between legs when laying on side, and ice for 15 minutes every 4 to 6 hours. I hope this helps. He says to contact him if it doesn't appear to help. I just started treating it, so I will see. Also, I was a floor installer in for about twenty years, bending down on concrete floors for 8 to 10 hours per day, and I live in a basement house where I climb up and down stairs constantly, as my bedroom is downstairs.

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