Retinal Detachment - Experience

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

Please describe your experience with retinal detachment.

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the white square:

What is a retinal detachment?

A retinal detachment is a separation of the retina from its attachments to the underlying tissue within the eye. Most retinal detachments are a result of a retinal break, hole, or tear. These retinal breaks may occur when the vitreous gel pulls loose or separates from its attachment to the retina, usually in the peripheral parts of the retina. The vitreous is a clear gel that fills two-thirds of the inside of the eye and occupies the space in front of the retina. As the vitreous gel pulls loose, it will sometimes exert traction on the retina, and if the retina is weak, the retina will tear. Most retinal breaks are not a result of injury. Retinal tears are sometimes accompanied by bleeding if a retinal blood vessel is included in the tear. Many people develop separation of the vitreous from the retina as they get older. However, only a small percentage of these vitreous separations result in retinal tears.

Once the retina has torn, liquid from the vitreous gel can then pass through the tear and accumulate behind the retina. The buildup of fluid behind the retina is what separates (detaches) the retina from the back of the eye. As more of the liquid vitreous collects behind the retina, the extent of the retinal detachment can progress and involve the entire retina, leading to a total retinal detachment. A retinal detachment almost always affects only one eye at a time. The second eye, however, must be checked thoroughly for any signs of predisposing factors or existing retinal tears or holes that may lead to detachment in the future.

Return to Retinal Detachment

See what others are saying

Comment from: Gina, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: November 05

I had Lasik surgery in October 1999 and suffered a detached retina in the weaker eye in November 2000. I had very slow recovery. I had to keep my head down for 10 days. Six weeks post operation I felt no better. Gas bubble in my eye showed no signs of going away. I finally showed some improvement in late December. My eye has scars, and vision has greatly deteriorated since then. The other eye is fine.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Mohamed, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: May 06

My left retina detached subsequent to a brutal frontal blunt assault two months earlier. A high density gas was used to reattach the torn retina. The gas bubble contracted over a 5 week period. It is 4 months since my operation and my vision is still very poor and distorted with kinks and reduced image size. Due to the assault and initial surgery to augment the eye socket I have double vision. I have been advised that it takes up to a year for the retina to heal and stabilize and when it does and the vision is not restored it has very little chance of recovering. An orthoptist has to be consulted to assist in resolving the double vision. Retinal surgery is not to be taken lightly as it can recur, or as in my case it has rendered me incapable of going back to work. It negatively impacts on the quality of your life like walking outdoors requires a walking stick or being legally unfit to drive a vehicle.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

STAY INFORMED

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!


Health Solutions From Our Sponsors