Ankle Pain And Tendinitis - Symptoms

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What injuries can cause ankle pain?

Ankle sprains and fractures

Ankle sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries. Sprains are injuries to the ligaments of the ankle, causing them to partially or completely tear as a result of sudden stretching. They can occur on either or both of the inner and outer portions of the ankle joint. Ankle sprains more commonly happen when there is a preexisting muscle weakness in the ankle area or a history of previous ankle injuries. The typical injury occurs when the ankle is suddenly "twisted" in a sports activity or by stepping off an uneven surface. The pain is initially severe and can be associated with a "popping" sensation. Immediate swelling over the area of injury often occurs as the injured blood vessels leak fluid into the local tissue. Examination of the area may cause severe pain when the ankle is moved. The degree of pain may not necessarily indicate the degree of damage to the ligament(s). Ligament injuries are often graded from I to III, ranging from partial to complete tears. Partial tears retain some ankle stability, whereas complete tears lose stability because the strapping ligaments no longer brace the ankle joint. After an examination, significant ankle sprains are commonly evaluated with an X-ray. X-rays can determine whether there is an accompanying break (fracture) of the bone.

Acute ankle sprains are initially treated with ice, rest, and limiting the amount of walking and weight-bearing on the injured ankle. The leg can be elevated to reduce swelling, and crutches are often recommended to avoid further trauma to the injured ligaments. Anti-inflammatory medications can be given to reduce local inflammation. Ice packs help decrease further swelling of the area and can reduce pain. Patients with severe injuries are placed in immobilization casts. Surgical repair of grade III injuries is considered, especially for those patients contemplating future athletic participation. Physical therapy programs are part of the rehabilitation process, incorporating strengthening exercises of the lower leg muscles. Broken ankles (fractures) can accompany ankle sprains or occur without sprains. Fractures are repaired with casting to immobilize the bone for healing. Depending on the severity, fractures can require orthopedic casting, surgical procedures including pinning, and open repair of the fractured bone.

Tendinitis

Tendinitis (also referred to as tendonitis) is an inflammation of the tendon. Tendinitis of the ankle can involve the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibial tendon, or the peroneal tendon. This condition usually results from trauma, such as from sudden injury in sports or overuse injury as from running but can result from underlying inflammatory diseases or illnesses such as reactive arthritis (formerly called Reiter's syndrome), rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. All forms of tendinitis cause pain, swelling, and tenderness in the tendon area involved. The onset may be rapid, such as with an athletic injury. Immediate treatment of tendinitis involves immobilizing the area, elevation, and limiting weight-bearing, applying ice, and using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to decrease inflammation. NSAIDs such as naproxen (Naprosyn) or ketoprofen (Orudis) are commonly used for this purpose. More severe inflammation can require orthopedic casting. Athletic participation should be limited when the tendon is still inflamed, as there is a significant risk of rupturing or tearing the tendon, especially in the Achilles area, with continued athletic activity. Achillestendon more frequently occurs in patients who have had previous Achilles tendon inflammation. When the Achilles tendon ruptures, it usually requires orthopedic surgical repair.

Picture of the metatarsal (foot) and calcaneus (heel) bones, the plantar fascia ligament, and the Achilles tendon of the lower leg and foot
Picture of the metatarsal (foot) and calcaneus (heel) bones, the plantar fascia ligament, and the Achilles tendon of the lower leg and foot
Return to Ankle Pain

See what others are saying

Comment from: GMetheny, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: February 07

I have been in severe ankle pain for 3 days. There are no apparent injury signs or pain until I put weight on my foot. At the moment it feels like a severe sprain. It is below the ankle bone on the small toe side. There is no swelling or warmth to the touch. I have kept it elevated and I am taking 800 mg ibuprofen every 6 hours.

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Comment from: lighthouse, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: May 13

My tendon problems all began after taking ciprofloxacin (Cipro). After only 2 doses I had to go to the emergency room (ER). Now I"m having pain, popping and swelling in my joints. The worst of it is in my right ankle. Through research, I discovered that angstrom magnesium can help reverse the side effects of this drug. I have only been taking the magnesium for a few days but it seems to be helping. The swelling is less and I am able to walk better. I hope this can help others.

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