Hamstring Injury - Treatment

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What kinds of treatment, including therapy, did you receive for your hamstring injury?

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How are hamstring injuries treated?

Most hamstring injuries heal without surgery. In rare cases, where there is a complete rupture at the ischium, or where significant piece of ischial bone is jerked away, surgery is necessary. Essentially, all other grade I-III tears are best treated without surgery.

The goal of treatment is to restore muscle function and prevent scar formation. Initially, treatment consists of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). Rest refers to avoidance of offending activities and oftentimes includes immobilization. In severe cases, crutches or splinting may be necessary. Ice, compression, and elevation all assist in controlling pain and swelling. A short course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Children's Advil/Motrin, Medipren, Motrin, Nuprin, PediaCare Fever, and others), or naproxen (Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn, Aleve) may be helpful.

As soon as pain permits, it is important to begin a program of stretching and range-of-motion rehabilitation exercises because prolonged immobilization and inactivity results in muscle shrinkage (atrophy) and scar tissue (fibrosis). Excessive scar tissue is incompatible with healthy muscle function. Atrophy and fibrosis are best avoided or reduced by a program of motion and stretching implemented early in the rehabilitation process.

It should be emphasized that an early rehabilitation program does not mean a quick return to the desired usual activity. Given the type of individual that usually sustains a significant hamstring injury, it is usually a difficult task to keep athletic patients off the playing field. Reinjury is extremely common and is often due to avoidable premature return to sport. Reinjury not only prolongs recovery, it also increases the risk of permanent damage. People with these injuries should be informed early in the rehabilitation program about the risks of reinjury.

After pain and swelling have been controlled and acceptable range of motion and flexibility has been attained, a gradual strengthening program should follow. After adequate strength has returned, then a gradual return to the desired activity is attempted. Full return is usually possible only after maximal flexibility and optimal strength have been obtained. Depending on the severity of injury, the entire rehabilitative process may take several months. Physical therapists can assist in guiding the exercise program.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: andy, 19-24 Male (Patient) Published: April 08

Active release techniques were applied to my bicep femoris after my hamstring injury. This was performed by my chiropractor certified in the technique.

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