Sleep - Problems Experienced

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

What sleep problems have you experienced?

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the black square:

What are and what causes sleep disorders?

Sleep disorders are disruptions of the sleep cycle or the quality of sleep. About 40 million Americans are believed to suffer from chronic sleep disorders, with millions more affected on an occasional basis. Doctors have defined over 70 different types of sleep disorders, but the most common sleep disorders are insomnia, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy.

  • Insomnia is the perception of poor-quality sleep, including the inability to fall asleep or stay asleep. Because people differ in their need for sleep, there are no fixed criteria that define insomnia. Insomnia is very common and occurs in 30% to 50% of the general population. Approximately 10% of the population may suffer from chronic (long-standing) insomnia. Sleep onset insomnia is characterized as occurring at the beginning of the desired sleep time and lasting for greater than 30 minutes. Sleep maintenance insomnia is when individuals fall asleep, but awaken periodically or for lengthy periods during the night, increasing the wake-after-sleep-onset (WASO).
  • Sleep apnea is another common sleep disorder characterized by a reduction or pause of breathing (airflow) during sleep. Central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs when the brain does not send the signal to the muscles to take a breath, and there is no muscular effort to take a breath. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs when the brain sends the signal to the muscles and the muscles make an effort to take a breath, but they are unsuccessful because the airway becomes obstructed and prevents an adequate flow of air. Mixed sleep apnea occurs when there is both central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Restless leg syndrome (RLS), also known as nocturnal myoclonus, is a type of sleep disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable desire to move the legs. These abnormal sensations usually occur in the lower legs during the evening. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) are related to RLS, but occur after the onset of sleep and are labeled as a sleep disorder or syndrome when the movements cause increased activity in the brain. During the early stages of sleep, these episodes of leg movement often last up to an hour. The abnormal sensations of RLS are quite variable. They have been described as a crawling, creeping, pulling, drawing, tingling, pins and needles, or prickly discomfort. They are not cramping in character. Patients with RLS may have difficulty falling asleep because of the difficulty getting comfortable and an increased urge to move their legs. Many patients with RLS will have PLMs and vice versa, but they are not the same disorder.
  • Narcolepsy is a disease of the central nervous system that results uniformly in excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Other primary symptoms of narcolepsy include the loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), distorted perceptions (hypnagogic hallucinations), and the inability to move or talk (sleep paralysis). Additional symptoms can include disturbed nocturnal sleep and automatic behaviors (affected persons carry out certain actions without conscious awareness). All of the symptoms of narcolepsy may be present in various combinations and degrees of severity.

Other sleep disorders include:

  • periodic limb movement disorder
  • problem sleepiness
  • hypersomnia
  • sleepwalking
  • snoring
  • nightmares, and
  • night shift work sleep disorder
Return to Sleep

See what others are saying

Comment from: Kimber, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: August 21

Years of medications for various medical conditions have interfered with my sleep. I have tried everything from the homeopathic (melatonin) to Lunesta, Rozerem and Ambien and Ambien CR. I added a feather bed to my mattress. I've been cranking the air conditioning down and enjoying a hot bath before bed. On days in which I exercise for one to two hours, I have to do so in the morning. Late night exercise "wires" me. No caffeine after 3 p.m. No heavy meals past 6 or 7 p.m. No alcohol within five hours of sleep, if possible. Turn out the lights to set the body clock. I take Ambien CR and one mg of Xanax. I'm also using a product called "Snore Stop" for snoring and have seen a huge improvement in my REM sleep. As you can see, I have tried everything. The exercise and nutrition components seem to affect me the most.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Sig08, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: November 13

I think my sleeping problems have been since I was about 8. My dad's ex-girlfriend used to give me, my brother, and her little girl NyQuil every night before bed. I was hooked on NyQuil, and until about four years ago, I was still hooked. My husband and grandmother helped me to get off of that. Then, I was unable to sleep. So my mother-in-law gave me a muscle relaxer one night. I started taking Tylenol PM every night after that. Just recently I found out that I may be addicted to the Tylenol. I know it has the potential to kill my liver, but I need something. The situation at my house, the stress of my husband losing his job, the extended family living with us, my desire to succeed and potentially move up in the company I work for, and going to school online may be accompanying all the stress I feel. I realize that may be making it hard for me to fall asleep. I'm going to try these helpful hints on here, then go to my doctor. I'm trying so hard to not take anything. It's so hard though. I feel depressed a lot of the time, and I try to hide it. I wanted to tell this story to possibly help others.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

STAY INFORMED

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!