Pernicious Anemia - Share Your Experience

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What was the cause of your megaloblastic (pernicious) anemia? Please share your experience.

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What is megaloblastic anemia?

Sometimes, anemias are subclassified based upon the size and microscopic appearance of the red blood cells. In this regard, pernicious anemia is a form of megaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia refers to an abnormally large type of red blood cell (megaloblast). Megaloblasts are produced in the bone marrow when vitamin B-12 or folic acid levels are low. Megaloblastic anemia can also be caused by other disease of the bone marrow and can be a side effect of some cancer chemotherapy drugs.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: cal, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: May 12

I have had pernicious anemia since age 28. I am now 73. I have some permanent damage due to lack of diagnosis until age 30. But since having pernicious anemia I married and had two children. I now take a new B 12 which seems better for my health. It is methyl B 12. My father had pernicious anemia also and we are Scandinavian. So be sure to get plenty B 12 and take care of yourself.

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Comment from: MayoPatient, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: April 11

I was diagnosed with pernicious anemia (PA) about a year ago. B12 was <70. After a loading dose of B12 shots 5 days in a row, once a week for 4 weeks I then started getting shots once a month. After a few months, I could tell I was going downhill. My B12 level was again below normal. Now I get a shot every two weeks and feel so much better. If you feel that your shot doesn"t get you through the month, have your B12 level checked before you get your next shot. You have to be your own advocate. Get shots often enough to get your B12 level up to around 400. Also consider taking iron supplements because iron is hard to absorb.

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