Peptic Ulcer - Causes

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What are the causes of peptic ulcers?

For many years, excess acid was believed to be the major cause of ulcer disease. Accordingly, the emphasis of treatment was on neutralizing and inhibiting the secretion of stomach acid. While acid is still considered necessary for the formation of ulcers and its suppression is still the primary treatment, the two most important initiating causes of ulcers are infection of the stomach by a bacterium called "Helicobacter pyloricus" (H. pylori) and chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications or NSAIDs, including aspirin. Cigarette smoking also is an important cause of ulcers as well as failure of ulcer treatment.

Infection with H. pylori is very common, affecting more than a billion people worldwide. It is estimated that half of the United States population older than age 60 has been infected with H. pylori. Infection usually persists for many years, leading to ulcer disease in 10% to 15% of those infected. In the past, H. pylori was found in more than 80% of patients with gastric and duodenal ulcers. With increasing appreciation, diagnosis and treatment of this infection, however, the prevalence of infection with H. pylori as well as the proportion of ulcers caused by the bacterium has decreased; it is estimated that currently only 20% of ulcers are associated with the bacterium. While the mechanism by which H. pylori causes ulcers is complex, elimination of the bacterium by antibiotics has clearly been shown to heal ulcers and prevent their recurrence.

NSAIDs are medications used for the treatment of arthritis and other painful inflammatory conditions in the body. Aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn), and etodolac (Lodine) are a few examples of this class of medications. Prostaglandins are substances which are important in helping the linings of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum to resist damage by the acidic digestive juices of the stomach. NSAIDs cause ulcers by interfering with the production of prostaglandins in the stomach.

Cigarette smoking not only causes ulcers, but it also increases the risk of complications from ulcers such as ulcer bleeding, stomach obstruction, and perforation. Cigarette smoking also is a leading cause of failure of treatment for ulcers.

Contrary to popular belief, alcohol, coffee, colas, spicy foods, and caffeine have no proven role in ulcer formation. Similarly, there is no conclusive evidence to suggest that life stresses or personality types contribute to ulcer disease.

Peptic Ulcer Illustration - Peptic Ulcer Disease
Peptic Ulcer Illustration - Peptic Ulcer Disease

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Comment from: fires11, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: May 29

I have had to take aspirin on a regular basis. After trying many different meds for headaches, the aspirin is the only thing that helped. Unfortunately, I have developed duodenal ulcers with nausea and abdominal pain.

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