Huntington's Disease - Age Which Appear

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At what age does Huntington's disease appear?

The rate of disease progression and the age at onset vary from person to person. Adult-onset HD, with its disabling, uncontrolled movements, most often begins in middle age. There are, however, other variations of HD distinguished not just by age at onset but by a distinct array of symptoms. For example, some persons develop the disease as adults, but without chorea. They may appear rigid and move very little, or not at all, a condition called akinesia.

Some individuals develop symptoms of HD when they are very young, before age 20. The terms "early-onset" or "juvenile" HD are often used to describe HD that appears in a young person. A common sign of HD in a younger individual is a rapid decline in school performance. Symptoms can also include subtle changes in handwriting and slight problems with movement, such as slowness, rigidity, tremor, and rapid muscular twitching, called myoclonus. Several of these symptoms are similar to those seen in Parkinson's disease, and they differ from the chorea seen in individuals who develop the disease as adults. These young individuals are said to have "akinetic-rigid" HD or the Westphal variant of HD. People with juvenile HD may also have seizures and mental disabilities. The earlier the onset, the faster the disease seems to progress. The disease progresses most rapidly in individuals with juvenile or early-onset HD, and death often follows within 10 years.

Individuals with juvenile HD usually inherit the disease from their fathers. These individuals also tend to have the largest number of CAG repeats. The reason for this may be found in the process of sperm production. Unlike eggs, sperm are produced in the millions. Because DNA is copied millions of times during this process, there is an increased possibility for genetic mistakes to occur. To verify the link between the number of CAG repeats in the HD gene and the age at onset of symptoms, scientists studied a boy who developed HD symptoms at the age of two, one of the youngest and most severe cases ever recorded. They found that he had the largest number of CAG repeats of anyone studied so far, nearly 100. The boy's case was central to the identification of the HD gene and at the same time helped confirm that juveniles with HD have the longest segments of CAG repeats, the only proven correlation between repeat length and age at onset.

A few individuals develop HD after age 55. Diagnosis in these people can be very difficult. The symptoms of HD may be masked by other health problems, or the person may not display the severity of symptoms seen in individuals with HD of earlier onset. These individuals may also show symptoms of depression rather than anger or irritability, or they may retain sharp control over their intellectual functions, such as memory, reasoning, and problem-solving.

There is also a related disorder called senile chorea. Some elderly individuals display the symptoms of HD, especially choreic movements, but do not become demented, have a normal gene, and lack a family history of the disorder. Some scientists believe that a different gene mutation may account for this small number of cases, bu this has not been proven.

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Comment from: unknown, 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: December 02

My husband's mother side of the family has dealt with HD for a very long time. His grandmother had it. His mother died of it 30 years ago. His older sister has full blown symptoms for the last 15 years, his second oldest sister died 10 years ago. Now he is getting tested, he is very afraid since he is already showing mild symptoms. We are hoping for a negative result. He is 50 years old and still fully functional.

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Comment from: Gracie, 35-44 Female (Caregiver) Published: December 27

My cousin was diagnosed with HD (Huntington's disease) nine years ago. There is no history of this disease in our side nor her father's side of the family. She is married with two teenage sons. It was suggested that her boys do not have children unless they adopt. Watching her struggle with this is heart wrenching. Her motor skills are so out of control it's risky standing or sitting near her. It's so hard to believe that there is not more that can be done for these patients. Her doctor seems to be oblivious to any medications or treatments to help her. Two of her six siblings went through the test to see if they carry the gene. Neither were notified that they were carriers. Having no answers, not even close to a cure and no support for this awful disease is so unbelievable in these days.

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