Endometriosis - Diagnosis

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Describe tests or exams that led to a diagnosis of endometriosis.

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How is endometriosis diagnosed?

Endometriosis can be suspected based on symptoms of pelvic pain and findings during physical examinations in the doctor's office. Occasionally, during a rectovaginal exam (one finger in the vagina and one finger in the rectum), the doctor can feel nodules (endometrial implants) behind the uterus and along the ligaments that attach to the pelvic wall. At other times, no nodules are felt, but the examination itself causes unusual pain or discomfort.

Unfortunately, neither the symptoms nor the physical examinations can be relied upon to conclusively establish the diagnosis of endometriosis. Imaging studies, such as ultrasound, can be helpful in ruling out other pelvic diseases and may suggest the presence of endometriosis in the vaginal and bladder areas, but still cannot definitively diagnose endometriosis. For an accurate diagnosis, a direct visual inspection inside of the pelvis and abdomen, as well as tissue biopsy of the implants are necessary.

As a result, the only accurate way of diagnosing endometriosis is at the time of surgery, either by opening the belly with large-incision laparotomy or small-incision laparoscopy.

Laparoscopy is the most common surgical procedure for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Laparoscopy is a minor surgical procedure done under general anesthesia, or in some cases under local anesthesia. It is usually performed as an out-patient procedure (the patient going home the same day). Laparoscopy is performed by first inflating the abdomen with carbon dioxide through a small incision in the navel. A long, thin viewing instrument (laparoscope) is then inserted into the inflated abdominal cavity to inspect the abdomen and pelvis. Endometrial implants can then be directly seen.

During laparoscopy, biopsies (removal of tiny tissue samples for examination under a microscope) can also be performed for a diagnosis. Sometimes biopsies obtained during laparoscopy show endometriosis even though no endometrial implants are seen during laparoscopy.

Pelvic ultrasound and laparoscopy are also important in excluding malignancies (such as ovarian cancer) that can cause symptoms that mimic endometriosis symptoms.

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Comment from: KEN, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: April 10

My endometriosis was diagnosed through laparoscopic surgery. An X-ray revealed that one of my tubes might be blocked, so my OB / Gyn decided to do a laparoscopy, as I want to have children. This surgery revealed that it was endometriosis.

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