Cortisone Injection - Knee and Hip

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

Share your experience with cortisone injections in your hip or knee.

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the white triangle:

For what conditions are cortisone injections used?

Cortisone injections can be used to treat the inflammation of small areas of the body (local injections), or they can be used to treat inflammation that is widespread throughout the body (systemic injections). Examples of conditions for which local cortisone injections are used include inflammation of a bursa (bursitis of the hip, knee, elbow, or shoulder), a tendon (tendinitis such as tennis elbow), and a joint (arthritis). Knee osteoarthritis, hip bursitis, painful foot conditions such as plantar fasciitis, rotator cuff tendinitis, and many other conditions may be treated with cortisone injections. Injections of cortisone and an anesthetic such as lidocaine are sometimes used to confirm a diagnosis. For example, if pain in the buttock and groin improves after a cortisone injection in the hip, the pain is caused by hip arthritis rather than arthritis in the low back.

Epidural injections in the lumbar spine (lumbar epidural) are cortisone injections inserted into a specific location in the spinal canal of the low back by a specialist under X-ray guidance (fluoroscopy). These injections may help relieve back pain and sciatica. Epidural injections can also be given in other areas of the spinal canal to relieve upper back and neck pain.

Corticosteroid injections given in the shoulder may cure localized soft tissue inflammation in the shoulder such as bursitis or tendinitis. Cortisone injections of the shoulder may be used in conjunction with physical therapy to treat rotator cuff syndrome.

Systemic corticosteroid injections are used for more widespread conditions affecting many joints or the skin, such as allergic reactions, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. These injections are usually given intramuscularly, into a large muscle group such as the gluteus muscles in the buttocks, or into the deltoid muscle in the shoulder. The corticosteroid is then absorbed into the blood and travels through the bloodstream to treat the inflammation. Systemic corticosteroids can also be administered intravenously to treat more severe widespread inflammation.

Return to Cortisone Injection

See what others are saying

Comment from: Marqueso, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 01

I received a cortisone injection in each knee in early February. There must have been anesthetic in the shot because I had immediate, total relief which wore off in a day or so. Then I felt no improvement for almost 2 weeks. I had given up hope, but realized one day I was walking stairs with no pain! The inflammation I had had in the right knee, which prevented me from even getting into child's pose in yoga, was gone. From late February through all of March I was blissfully pain-free, doing every activity without symptoms. During April, little by little I started feeling that familiar ache again; now at the end of May it is as though I never had the shots at all. I will definitely get more; I have read 3 times a year is usually the maximum amount. If I can get two pain-free months each time, that equates to half of each year without pain! Thumbs up from me.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Karen, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 13

I had a left hip cortisone injection two days ago. The procedure was unpleasant, but I have had wonderful relief. I have no pain now, and I didn't realize how I was so limited. I hope this lasts! Cautiously optimistic but don't want to jinx it!

Was this comment helpful?Yes

STAY INFORMED

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors