Scoliosis - Treatment

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What is the treatment for scoliosis?

Treatment of scoliosis is based on the severity of the curve and the chances of the curve getting worse. Certain types of scoliosis have a greater chance of getting worse, so the type of scoliosis also helps to determine the proper treatment. There are three main categories of treatment: observation, bracing, and surgery.

Functional scoliosis is caused by an abnormality elsewhere in the body. This type of scoliosis is treated by treating that abnormality, such as a difference in leg length. A small wedge can be placed in the shoe to help even out the leg length and prevent the spine from curving. There is no direct treatment of the spine because the spine is normal in these people.

Neuromuscular scoliosis is caused by an abnormal development of the bones of the spine. These types of scoliosis have the greatest chance for getting worse. Observation and bracing do not normally work well for these people. The majority of these people will eventually need surgery to stop the curve from getting worse.

Treatment of idiopathic scoliosis is based on the age when it develops.

In many cases, infantile idiopathic scoliosis will improve without any treatment. X-rays can be obtained and measurements compared on future visits to determine if the curve is getting worse. Bracing is not normally effective in these people.

Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis has the highest risk for getting worse of all of the idiopathic types of scoliosis. Bracing can be tried early if the curve is not very severe. The goal is to prevent the curve from getting worse until the person stops growing. Since the curve starts early in these people, and they have a lot of time left to grow, there is a higher chance for needing more aggressive treatment or surgery.

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form of scoliosis. If the curve is small when first diagnosed, it can be observed and followed with routine X-rays and measurements. If the curve stays below 25 degrees, no other treatment is needed. You may return to see the doctor every three to four months to check for any worsening of the curve. Additional X-rays may be repeated each year to obtain new measurements and check for progression of the curve. If the curve is between 25-40 degrees and you are still growing, a brace may be recommended. Bracing is not recommended for people who have finished growing. If the curve is greater than 40 degrees, then surgery may be recommended.

As explained above, scoliosis is not typically associated with back pain. In cases with back pain, the symptoms can be lessened with physical therapy, massage, and exercises, including yoga. These can help to strengthen the muscles of the back. They are not, however, a cure for scoliosis and will not be able to correct the abnormal curve.

There are several different types of braces available for scoliosis. Some need to be worn nearly 24 hours a day and are removed only for showering. Others can be worn only at night. The ability of a brace to work depends on the person following the instructions from the doctor and wearing the brace as directed. Braces are not designed to correct the curve. They are used to help slow or stop the curve from getting worse.

If the curve stays below 40 degrees until the person is finished growing, it is not likely to get worse later in life. However, if the curve is greater than 40 degrees, it is likely to continue to get worse by 1-2 degrees each year for the rest of the person's life. If this is not prevented, the person could eventually be at risk for heart or lung problems. The goals of surgery for scoliosis are correcting and stabilizing the curve, reducing pain, and restoring a more normal curve and appearance to the spinal column.

Surgery involves correcting the curve back to as close to normal as possible and performing a spinal fusion to hold it in place. This is done with a combination of screws, hooks, and rods that are attached to the bones of the spine to hold them in place. The surgeon places bone graft around the bones to be fused to get them to grow together and become solid. This prevents any further curvature in that portion of the spine. In most cases, the screws and rods will remain in your spine and not need to be removed. There are many different ways for your surgeon to perform the fusion surgery. It may be all performed from a single incision on the back of your spine or combined with another incision along your front or side. This decision is based on the location and severity of the curve.

Surgery recovery varies some from person to person. Your doctor will use medications to control your pain initially after surgery. You will likely be up out of bed to a chair the first day after surgery. You will work with a physical therapist who will assist you in walking after the surgery. As you continue to recover, it is important to improve your muscle strength. The physical therapist can help you with exercises for your muscles that will also help with the pain.

As with any surgery, there are risks of surgery for scoliosis. The amount of risk depends partially on your age, the degree of curve, the cause of the curve, and the amount of correction attempted. In most cases the surgeon will use a technique called neuromonitoring during surgery. This allows the surgeon to monitor the function of the spinal cord and nerves during surgery. If they are being placed at increased risk of damage, the surgeon is alerted and can adjust the procedure to reduce those risks. There is a small risk of infection with any surgery. This risk is decreased with the use of antibiotics, but it can still occur in some cases. Other potential risks include injury to nerve or blood vessels, bleeding, continued curve progression after surgery, broken rods or screws, and the need for further surgery. Each of these is rare.

If a tumor such as osteoid osteoma is the cause of the scoliosis, surgery to remove the tumor is generally able to correct the curve.

People with degenerative scoliosis will often have more complaints of back and leg pain. This is related to the arthritis in the back and possible compression of the nerve roots that lead to the legs. Nonoperative treatment including physical therapy, exercises, and gentle chiropractic can help relieve these symptoms in some cases. People who fail to improve with these treatments may benefit from surgery. X-rays and possible MRIs will be obtained to plan for surgery. The surgery could include only a decompression or removal of bone spurs that are compressing the nerves. In some cases, a fusion will be necessary to stabilize the spine and possibly correct the abnormal curve.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: Lyn, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: September 27

In 1994 at the age of 35 I had surgery to correct my progressive scoliosis, which was then at a degree of 98. The surgery consisted of 2 eight hour operations, 5 days apart, i.e. 16 hours of surgery! The first op was to do preparation which consisted of fusions and the second was to insert instrumentation, consisting of rods and screws. Bone was removed from my hip to fill the spaces between my vertebrae once my spine had been straightened. Unfortunately, it was only straightened to 65 degrees for fear of over correcting but at least the curve has now been stabilized and will not deteriorate any further. After 17 of having a trouble free back, I work out regularly at the gym lifting weights and am as fit as a fiddle, thanks to the successful surgery.

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Comment from: tshrop08, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: June 04

In 2006 I was diagnosed with scoliosis. I have double major scoliosis which is two curves. It was hard to diagnose me because my hips were even because my two curves balanced each other out. My doctor misdiagnosed me and I finally was in so much pain I went to a specialist. I was then told I had a 35 degree top curve and a 65 degree bottom curve. She referred me to a hospital where I had to have emergency back surgery, I had 2 rods put in my back. After an 8 hour surgery I was in so much pain, and on so much pain medicine I still to this day can"t remember the first 3 days I was in the hospital. In 2012 at 18, I had to have the rods removed because I was in so much pain. I am still not back pain free and I won"t ever be. I've been told I need to "pain mange" but I don"t want to be on pain medicines for the rest of my life. I hate taking narcotics. But for the most part this has been a crazy experience, and I had to give up softball and any sport because I just can"t take the pain.

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