Cataracts - Treatments

What kinds of treatment or surgery did you have for your cataracts?

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What is the treatment for cataracts?

People with early cataract will find that changing their glasses, using sunglasses to decrease glare and having better lighting to read can significantly alleviate their symptoms. Magnifying lenses for close work and reading fine print may also be helpful.

Many cataracts are not bothersome, causing few symptoms. In that situation, no surgical treatment is necessary. However, the only true treatment for cataract is surgical removal of the cloudy lens. Surgery is suggested if the patient loses the ability to perform necessary activities of everyday life, such as driving, reading, or looking at computer or video screens, even with glasses, and there is the expectation that vision will improve as a result of the surgery.

Patients' responses to cataracts vary. A cataract in only one eye may be disturbing to a particular patient and may not cause significant symptoms in another patient.

Cataracts usually do not harm your eye, so you can have surgery when it is convenient for you and when they interfere with your daily activities. Once you understand the benefits and risks of surgery, you can make an informed decision about whether cataract surgery is right for you. In most cases, delaying cataract surgery will not cause long-term damage to your eye or make the surgery more difficult.

If the eye has other diseases that have caused visual loss such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or optic nerve damage from glaucoma, cataract surgery may not improve the vision.

Occasionally, your doctor may recommend removal of a cataract if it prevents diagnosis or treatment of another eye problem, such as macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy.

If both eyes have cataracts and surgery is agreed upon, the surgery on the second eye is generally planned at least a week after the first eye. There is usually no harm in waiting a much longer period of time between the two eye operations.

Because the lens of the eye is necessary to accurately focus light onto the retinal surface and removal of the cataract involves removal of the lens, modern cataract surgery combines removal of the lens and placement of a new artificial lens into the eye. Measurements for the size, shape, and power of this lens will be taken prior to the surgery so that the lens can be available at the time of surgery.

More than 2 million cataract surgeries are performed annually in the United States. It is extremely safe and effective, improving vision in the vast majority of patients.

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