The Cleveland Clinic

Breast Cancer and Menopause

Menopause itself is not associated with an increased risk of developing cancer. However, the rates of many cancers, including breast cancer, do increase with age. In addition, some of the drugs used to manage menopausal symptoms may increase or decrease a person's cancer risk.

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer?

Certain factors increase the risk of developing breast cancer. However, having many risk factors does not mean a woman will develop breast cancer, and having no risk factors does not mean she will not develop the disease.

Age is the single-most important risk factor for breast cancer. The chances of developing the disease increase with age. About 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year are over age 50, and almost half are age 65 and older.

Personal risk is also greater if an immediate family member (mother, sister, or daughter) has had breast cancer, particularly if it was at an early age. Also, women who have had a breast biopsy (removal of breast tissue) that shows certain types of benign disease, such as atypical hyperplasia, are more likely to get breast cancer.

Other risk factors include:

  • Having cancer in one breast (may recur or develop in other)
  • Late menopause (after age 55)
  • Starting menstruation early in life (before age 12)
  • Having a first child after age 30
  • Never having children

Does Hormone Therapy (HT) Increase a Woman's Chances of Developing Breast Cancer?