Flat Belly Diet! Does It Fall Flat on Its Promises (cont.)

The Four-Day Anti-Bloat Jumpstart

The first part of this diet is called the Four-Day Anti-Bloat Jumpstart. The book states that "in just four days, you'll lose several pounds and inches" and it promises to "shrink your belly-a loss of up to 5 ¾ total inches." The premise for this is to get you motivated to proceed with the remainder of the diet by seeing some results happen quickly. The goal for these four days is to eliminate gas, heavy solids, and excess fluid. A 1,200-calorie diet is given with the instruction to avoid

  • salt,


  • excess carbs,


  • raw bulky foods,


  • gassy foods,


  • chewing gum,


  • sugar alcohols,


  • fried foods,


  • spicy foods,


  • carbonated drinks, and


  • alcohol, coffee, tea, hot cocoa, and acidic fruit juices.

Those following this plan are also instructed to take a five-minute after meal walk.

The calorie goal for this is low for the average woman who needs to lose weight. In fact, the calorie goal for both parts of this diet is not ideal for long-term success. Your calorie needs are based on your height, weight, age, gender, and activity level. It's always best to determine your own needs and use that as your goal. In order to lose weight, you need to consume fewer calories than your body needs. When you cut out 3,500 calories from your maintenance calories, you lose one pound of body weight, not body fat as stated in this book. The way to determine your calorie needs is to get your maintenance needs and subtract 500 calories per day to lose 1 pound per week (500 x 7 days = 3,500 calories) or subtract 1,000 calories per day to lose 2 pound per week (1,000 x 7 days = 7,000 calories).

The guidelines to lose 1 to 2 pounds per week are set so that you lose an optimal amount of fat and muscle. Each pound that we gain from eating an extra 3,500 calories contains 75% fat and 25% muscle. Many people believe that you only gain fat, but that is not the case. When you lose weight, you will also lose fat and muscle. The recommended 1- to 2-pound per week weight loss is set so that you lose what you gained: 75% fat and 25% muscle. The faster that you lose weight, the more muscle and the less fat you will lose. So, if your maintenance calories are 2,800 and you consume 1,200 calories, you are going to lose more muscle than fat, especially with a plan that does not require any resistance exercise.

I also think that this part of the diet could be a trigger for many people. Studies have shown that deprivation when trying to lose weight does not help. People either end up consuming too much of something else or overeating the food that they were trying to avoid. This is also a temporary fix. The bloating can easily return once any of the omitted foods or beverages are added back. You can use these suggestions as part of your daily intake to limit the amount of foods that could contribute to fluid retention without having to omit everything.

The Four-Week Eating Plan

The primary part of this diet begins after the initial four-day diet. This part will last for 28 days. The 1,600-calorie requirement is set based on a "40+ woman of average height, frame size, and activity level to get to and stay at her ideal body weight." Again, this calorie level is not going to be ideal for everyone. The guidelines for this part are

  • eat monounsaturated fat at every meal,


  • consume 400 calories per meal, and


  • never go more than four hours without eating.

There are lots of recipes that you can choose from for each of the 400 calorie meals. They do not list the fat, carbohydrate, or protein content of any of these meals. There is also no fiber count listed. Dietary fiber is essential for every one of us. Contrary to what the book says, some fiber is absorbed, so it can add calories to your diet. The health benefits of fiber far outweigh the small amount of calories that you would actually absorb.

Some people may have a hard time with consuming 400 calorie meals all day and/or eating every four hours. The emphasis on consuming breakfast is correct, but you may find that you prefer to break your calories up differently. It's important to follow an eating plan that fits your lifestyle or that feeling of being "on a diet" will take over. What matters most is reaching your recommended amount of calories for the entire day by eating at least three meals with a balance of foods from each of the food groups.

There is some discussion about the emotional component of eating and the need to monitor what you consume and how you are feeling. Let's face it, there is a lot that impacts what, when, why, and how much we eat. Some people need more support and guidance on making this behavior change than what is covered in this book.

Though the cover of the book states that "not a single crunch is required" in order to flatten your belly, there is a chapter devoted to exercise. I like the suggestion that is made that it can be better to focus on changing one thing at a time. I completely agree with focusing on your diet first. I just think that the claim that is initially made can be misleading. The research is clear that the single best predictor of keeping your weight off is exercise. There are going to be people who can lose some inches from their waist through dietary changes but will not be able to "flatten" their belly without exercise.

The quick fix or that "magic" nutrient that you add or remove from your diet is not what it takes to achieve long-term success with weight loss. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults states that successful weight loss and maintenance requires diet, physical activity, and behavior modifications. The goal needs to be making changes that you can maintain so that you do not put back on the weight that you lost. While this book provides some useful recipes and information about body fat and monounsaturated fats, it is probably not going to help you achieve long-term success with weight loss if you have a substantial amount to lose.


Last Editorial Review: 3/24/2008



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