Fad Diets: Can Quick-Fix Diets Work? (cont.)

Why, despite the advice of most nutrition experts, are we fascinated by the myriad diet plans crowding bookstore shelves? "Most individuals want cutting-edge solutions for weight loss, and fad diets offer, at least on the surface, 'new' ways to beat the boring mathematical reality of long-term weight loss," explains Robin Steagall, RD, nutrition communications manager for the Calorie Control Council.

"All diets work on the principle of cutting calories [cutting 500 calories a day can result in a 1-pound weight loss in a week]," Steagall adds, "but every new diet has some unique twist to accomplish this mission."

Among the newest, for example, is The Fast-Food Diet, co-authored by Stephen Sinatra, MD, and Jim Punkre, which capitalizes on the American love affair with, yes, fast food. While the diet doesn't promote fast food per se, it acknowledges that many of us (on any given day, the authors say, 25% of our population) visit fast-food restaurants because they're convenient and affordable.

So, they suggest, if you're there already, make healthy choices that can lead to weight loss. Some tips: Choose the smallest drink size, or better yet, switch from soda to club soda or water; order from the children's menu; or eat a baked potato, not fries.

Eating From the Bible

Another currently popular program, the Maker's Diet, created by Jordan S. Rubin, is based on the theory of a "biblically correct diet and lifestyle," including modest portions of whole foods from sources consumed in as close to a natural (unrefined and unprocessed) state as possible. Rubin's plan also focuses on emotional and spiritual health. His diet's seven keys are: eat to live; supplement diet with whole foods, living nutrients, and superfoods; practice advanced hygiene; condition your body with exercise and body therapies; reduce toxins in your environment; avoid deadly emotions; and live a life of prayer and purpose.

Clinical dietitian Janet Basom of the Joe Arrington Cancer Center (JACC) in Lubbock, Texas, says that just because a diet plan -- more specifically, this particular diet plan -- is on the best-seller list, doesn't mean that it doesn't work or that it's not sensible.

"Through both my professional and personal experience, this plan is in tune with what I believe to be true," says Basom.

"This isn't a 'far-out' diet," Basom adds. "The goal of the program is to help people make permanent lifestyle choices, not necessarily to lose weight. It's more about teaching people to make the best selections, not only in what they eat, but in how they live."

Basom has been so encouraged by the results of the Maker's Diet that she has received a grant to conduct a research trial on the program among the 100-plus employees at JACC.

Recognizing the Fads

Not every popular, new diet can be classified as a "fad" diet, says Basom, which she defines as one that is more of a "quick fix" that is not going to lead to improved health, and that can't be pursued on a long-term basis.