Medical Problems Keeping You From Losing Weight? (cont.)

Two other considerations: people tend to gain weight with age for unknown reasons, and though it's not a medical condition, drinking alcohol in moderate to excessive amounts can sabotage your efforts to lose weight. Alcohol (including beer and wine) is a refined carbohydrate, similar to sugar, candy, and white flour. Besides adding calories, alcohol may raise blood sugar and insulin levels, which can contribute to weight gain.

A Prescription for Weight Gain?

It's not only medical conditions that can add pounds. Some medications can also cause you to gain weight, or keep you from losing it, says Ken Fujioka, MD, medical director of the Scripps Clinic Nutrition and Metabolism Research Center in San Diego.


"It's ot only medical conditions that can add pounds. Some medications can also cause you to gain weight."

"It's very common for medications to cause weight gain," says Fujioka, noting that approximately 25% of his patients are on medication or have an illness that is causing them to gain weight.

Among the medications that may cause weight gain in some people are:

  • Medications used to treat type 2 diabetes (such as sulfonylureas)
  • Antipsychotic or schizophrenia medications, including chlorpromazine (such as Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and olanzapine (Zyprexa)
  • Beta-blockers (prescribed for high blood pressure, and some heart conditions)
  • Antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Norpramin), or trazodone (Desyrel)
  • Hormone replacement therapy
  • Birth control pills
  • Corticosteroids taken for conditions like asthma and lupus
  • Antiepileptics taken to control seizures, especially valproic acid (Depakene or Depakote) and carbamazepine (such as Tegretol)

The reasons certain medications cause weight gain can vary and are not always known, says Fujioka.

Antipsychotic drugs, for example, may increase appetite as well as lower the metabolic rate (the rate at which your body burns calories). Beta-blockers are thought to lower a person's metabolic rate by about 80 calories a day. And hormone replacement therapy increases the body's level of estrogen, a fat-storing hormone.

"Weight gain is a very troublesome -- and unpredictable -- side effect of certain medications," says Arthur Frank, MD, director of the George Washington University Weight Management Program. "You can experience a substantial weight gain if you're sensitive to that particular medication."

But if you're gaining weight on one medication, your doctor may be able to help you find a similar drug that won't have the same effect. For example, an older class of antidepressants known as tricyclics may cause weight gain, while a newer class of depression medication called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) usually doesn't, says Fujioka. SSRIs include Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft.

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