Workout: Try a Kinder, Gentler Workout (cont.)

A word of caution: By itself, any one of these low-impact exercises is not enough to stay fit, the experts warn.

The ideal routine combines the strength, flexibility, and balance training of yoga and Pilates with an aerobic activity such as brisk walking, Cooper says. "Or try recumbent cycling: You can push real hard and get your heart going," but there is less impact, and thus lower risk of injury, than with a treadmill or jogging.

So, how can you incorporate these gentler, kinder exercises into your routine?

If you don't already belong to a gym, start by calling health clubs in your area and requesting specific information about the equipment and classes they offer, advises Jamy McGee, fitness director at the Wellness Center at Meadowmont, part of the University of North Carolina Healthcare System in Chapel Hill.

If a club seems to meet your needs, pay a visit, she says: "Take a walk through the place, look around. Are there enough elliptical trainers and recumbent bicycles to meet the needs of members during peak times?

"The club should offer a free equipment orientation or a free session with a personal trainer so you can become familiar with the equipment," she says.

If you have the Pilates or yoga bug, ask about class size: Fewer than six students is best, she says. "You want some personal attention to ensure you don't get into any bad habits."

Watch a class and ask about the instructor's credentials, McGee says. Levels of education and skill among teachers vary widely. And definitely ask other gym members for their opinion.

Complete beginners may also want to try a video, McGee says.

If you already belong to a gym and want to sign up for yoga or Pilates classes, look for those that cater to beginners, she says: "There is a lot to learn. Whether it's a breathing technique or a particular stretch, you should give it time. If you start with an advanced class, you probably won't like it and you may even injure yourself."

Similarly, don't just jump on the elliptical trainer and start pedaling away, McGee says. "It's a little harder than a treadmill; more coordination is needed. So you may want to ask an instructor for help or start out by walking on a treadmill."

Mix It Up

Cooper suggests setting aside one or two days a week for yoga and/or Pilates, and the others for your low-intensity aerobic activity. A varied program will avoid muscle overuse, while alleviating boredom.

Whether you choose brisk walking or a spin on the recumbent bicycle for your cardiovascular workout, a minimum of 30 minutes, three to five days a week, is recommended.

The right mix offers endless benefits, says Golden. "Before I started my [low-impact program], I was in really bad shape. Now I have the movement I always wanted. People tell me I look younger and I definitely feel healthier than I have in years."

Originally published Aug. 12, 2003
Medically updated July 13, 2004.


SOURCES: June Golden, communications specialist, New York. Harvey Lauer, president, American Sports Data Inc. Jamy McGee, fitness director, Wellness Center at Meadowmont, University of North Carolina Healthcare System, Chapel Hill, N.C. Richard Cotton, spokesman, American Council on Exercise. IHSRA Trend Report, July 2002. American Sports Data Inc., web site.

©2004 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.
Last Editorial Review: 4/12/2005 7:27:41 PM



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