Fall Foods to Be Thankful for

The 'Recipe Doctor' lightens up cool-weather favorites

By Elaine Magee, MPH, RD
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic - Feature

Reviewed By Louise Chang, MD

I know it's fall when there are more leaves OFF the trees than on them. I know it's fall when I need socks or slippers on my feet when I work late at night on the computer at the far end of my 50-year-old house. I know it's fall when it's dark out long before I've been able to rustle up dinner for my family. We all know it's fall when pumpkin pies become standard fare at supermarket bakeries, and when sparkling cider, sweetened condensed milk, and cranberry sauce suddenly get their own displays at the end of the aisles.

There's something about favorite fall foods that speaks to our hearts as well as our stomachs. It's tradition and celebration and comfort food all rolled into one spectacular season. (Can you tell this is my favorite time of year?)

Many fall foods are favorites simply because they are harvested during the fairly dismal months of cold-weather produce (things like apples, cranberries, and winter squash). Others are beloved because we generally only have them around this time of year (though we could eat them year round). It's like we have to be reminded about them by magazines, the holidays, or special store displays. I ask you, what's wrong with eating pumpkin pie in July? Why can't we make fudge in February?

It just feels natural to start craving comfort foods and holiday dishes about the time the pumpkins start growing their own heads of hair while drooping on our front porches in early November. It's as if we're programmed to desire certain fall foods, just as the leaves are programmed to turn colors and fall off their branches.