His and Hers Fitness

When it comes to working out, men and women are from different planets

By Carol Sorgen
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic - Feature

Reviewed By Charlotte Grayson, MD

His idea of getting in shape is pumping iron -- the more, the better. She'd rather pull out the yoga mat.

Whose idea of fitness is better?

The experts say there's no one-size-fits-all answer, but each sex could learn something from the other.

Vive La Difference

Motivation, the experts say, is one major fitness difference between the sexes.

Often, "men work out because they like to be bigger," says Vincent Perez, PT, director of sports therapy at Columbia University Medical Center Eastside in New York. "Pecs, biceps, quads ? men are after bulk."

"Guys have an agenda," adds Pamela Peeke, MD, author of Body-for-LIFE for Women: A Woman's Plan for Physical and Mental Transformation. "They have a specific goal, and there's always a number involved." She calls this the "Home Depot" approach to working out: "They have a blueprint and they just want to get it done."

For many men, "working out is a sport, and they do it because it's fun, it's competitive, and it's something that they've always done," says Lori Incledon, author of Strength Training for Women. "For women, fitness is a superficial issue. They do it because it will help them look better."

Men like to look like they've been working out, says Peeke, "the sweatier the better. When was the last time you heard a woman say she wanted to sweat?"