Winter Super Foods: Sweet Potatoes: Nutrient Profile

WebMD Public Information from the Department of Health and Human Services

Sweet potatoes are a Native American plant that was the main source of nourishment for early homesteaders and for soldiers during the Revolutionary War.

These tuberous roots are among the most nutritious foods in the vegetable kingdom. They are packed with calcium, potassium, and vitamins A and C. This is why one colonial physician called them the "vegetable indispensable."

Sweet potatoes are often confused with yams, but yams are large, starchy roots grown in Africa and Asia. Yams can grow up to 100 pounds and are rarely available in American supermarkets. Nutritionally, sweet potatoes greatly outweigh yams. Because of the common use of the term "yam," it is acceptable to use this term when referring to sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes contain an enzyme that converts most of its starches into sugars as the potato matures. This sweetness continues to increase during storage and when they are cooked.

Nutrient Profile

Serving size 3 1/2 oz raw
(1 1/2 cups shredded)
Amounts Per Serving
% Daily Value
Calories
140
Calories from Fat
0
0
Total Fat
0g
0%
Saturated Fat
0g
0%
Cholesterol
0mg
0%
Sodium
24mg
1%
Potassium
195mg
5%
Total Carbohydrate
6g
2%
Dietary Fiber
2g
8%
Sugars
3g
Protein
1g
Vitamin A
15%
Vitamin C
47%
Calcium
4%
Iron
2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Updated 2005


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