Sex, Love and Intimacy Throughout Midlife's Changes

WebMD Live Events Transcript

Keep the sexual sparks flying! Join medical writer and lecturer Ruth S. Jacobowitz to discuss your concerns about midlife sex, love and intimacy and learn about the latest findings in endocrinology, urology, sexology, psychology, and geriatric medicine.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

mold28_WebMD: Are the signs of heart attack different in men and women?

Jacobowitz: Yes. Men are bigger crybabies.

Moderator: Welcome Members! We will begin our discussion with Ruth S. Jacobowitz at 6pm EST. Please feel free to ask Ruth Jacobowitz your questions about midlife sex, love and intimacy at any time. Please preface your question with /ask. EXAMPLE: /ask What is the topic?

Moderator: Welcome Members! How is everyone doing? We will begin our discussion with Ruth Jacobowitz in about 25 minutes

Today we will be discussing resolving sexual problems, safe sex tactics, gaining sexual energy through exercise, hormone replacement therapies, and communicating your sexual needs to your partner. Please feel free to ask Ruth Jacobowitz your questions about midlife sex, love and intimacy at any time, even before the event begins. Please preface your question with /ask. EXAMPLE: /ask What is the topic?

Are there any new chatters today? Well, this process is very easy and a lot of fun. In order to ask our guest, in this case, Ruth S. Jacobowitz questions, you need to preface each question with the command "/ask" (with no quote marks). so, start by typing /ask leave one space and then type in your question and hit return or enter... that pops your question up to the stage so I can opse it to Ruth... that should have read: pose it to Ruth! If you would like to give it a try, just by typing the question What is the topic? I'll let you know that it popped up to the stage

poppylv_WebMD: I've heard the phrase "use it or lose it" about midlife sex. How true is this statement?

Moderator: Welcome to the Women's Health Place Program on WebMD Live. Our guest today is medical writer and lecturer Ruth Jacobowitz. Ruth S. Jacobowitz is a women's health advocate, lecturer, and the author of five women's health books, including 150 Most-Asked Questions About Midlife Sex, Love, and Intimacy: What Women and Their Partners Really Want to Know.

Jacobowitz: Hello. I am so pleased to be with you again today

Moderator: Today we will be discussing resolving sexual problems, safe sex tactics, gaining sexual energy through exercise, hormone replacement therapies, and communicating your sexual needs to your partner.

Welcome Ruth, it is a pleasure to have you back on WebMD Live.

Jacobowitz: Good to be back

Moderator: Thanks to everyone for your patience... WebMD apologizes for the wait. Ruth, perhaps we could start with an overview of what is happening hormonally with a woman at midlife...

Jacobowitz: Good place to start! At midlife -- peri-menopause and menopause -- we are experiencing shifting hormones. When we get to post-menopause, we have usually run out of estrogen and progesterone and, for some of us, that wee bit of testosterone that we have. Testosterone, the so-called "male hormone," is the hormone that makes us experience desire. Many women aren't aware that lack of libido can be a hormone problem. In a large survey that I did for the book, I learned that 79% of the women surveyed experienced a loss of desire and, of that number, 40% had no libido at all.

Moderator: Does this differ in men? Or do they have similar loss of desire and libido?

Jacobowitz: There is nothing in the male physiology that compares with women's abrupt loss of hormones at menopause.

abigale_WebMD: What's the scoop on testosterone therapy in women?

Jacobowitz: Testosterone therapy for women is becoming more widely accepted in the United States. It has been used for a longer period of time in England and Australia. The problem is that most women aren't aware of its availability and don't ask their physicians about it. Testosterone has been around a long time. One medication, Estratest--a combination of estrogen and testosterone--has been in use here since the 1960s.

karenjoyarney_WebMD: Is it usual or unusual for older men to experience erectile problems? Is this to be expected?

Jacobowitz: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not inevitable in men. It is often caused by the medications men are taking for high blood pressure, diabetes, anxiety, and depression. Once the physician is made aware of the problem, often a switch to another product or another dose can eliminate the problem. No ED is not inevitable. In the book, I discuss testosterone replacement for both men and women.




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