Breastfeeding: Basics and Beyond (cont.)

TAMARO:
Are you bored of reading and watching videos yet? Read my book. Do you have any friends that are breastfeeding?

MEMBER QUESTION:
I've been told that I may deliver at around 32 weeks. Any advice on how to BF successfully in that scenario?

TAMARO:
There's a section on preemies in my book. It will require more work on your part, but it is doable. You will absolutely need assistance from a good lactation specialist.

MEMBER QUESTION:
How does a mother initially prep the breast for the first time of baby feeding?

TAMARO:
She takes them for a walk. No, I'm kidding. There are no breast pushups which should be done. You might want to walk around the neighborhood flashing your neighbors if you have to do something.

It's best not to knead or pull on the nipple, and you shouldn't apply any kind of cream. There's one caveat. If you know you have inverted nipples, you may want to use breast shells, not shields. This gently coaxes the nipple by everting it through a hole.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I have had nipple piercings, although they've been out for five years now. This is my first pregnancy and some people say I will not be able to breastfeed because of the old piercings. Could you shed any light on this? Will I have a problem?

TAMARO:
I think it's so cool you had your nipples pierced. I have enough problems with the holes I already have. I don't think you will have problems because milk comes out of more than one hole. You may have scarred your nipples. You can tell by compressing your breasts and looking to see if any of the tiny holes suddenly spew a few drops of milk.

MEMBER QUESTION:
What makes it so hard the first four weeks, and what can we do to make them better?

TAMARO:
Hmmmmm. You are about to have your first child, aren't you? This answer could go on, and does go on for 337 pages in So That's What They're For! The simple answer is there are a lot of body parts to coordinate, and there is a learning curve. I think it's helpful to know going into it that you may have problems so that you're not lulled into a false sense of complacency as I was.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I am breastfeeding my 3-week-old and a couple of times while feeding in a side-lying position at night, we have both fallen asleep. I'll wake up several hours later and the nipple is still in her mouth. Is this OK? I've heard of bottle rot for bottle-fed babies, is there something similar for breastfed babies?

"Somewhere between week four and week six the "Oh-my-god I'm going to scream!" pain should be long gone."

TAMARO:
When the first teeth start erupting you probably will want to stop this, unless your six-week-old already has chompers. At 3 weeks old you should be fine -- for a few more months.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I want to make sure my baby is getting enough "hind milk." Approximately how long does he need to nurse at each breast to guarantee he is getting enough?

TAMARO:
Stop timing your breasts! He will let you know when he wants to come off. If he only makes it through one breast before falling asleep, just offer him the full one when he's hungry again, because he will be, trust me.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I had
breast reduction surgery 13 years ago. How can I tell in advance if breastfeeding is an option? I do not know if the milk ducts were cut or not. It seems as if there might be duct openings on at least my right breast -- they look like regularly spaced pimples and are occasionally sore. Is this wishful thinking, or are these developing milk ducts?

TAMARO:
Could be developing milk ducts. Take a warm shower when you're close to your due date, compress each breast and see if any droplets of milk get ejected. Good luck.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My baby is 4 weeks old. My breasts are still sore and tender after a feeding. I believe he is latched on correctly. When should the tenderness subside?

TAMARO:
Somewhere between week four and week six the "Oh-my-god I'm going to scream!" pain should be long gone. It could be he is latching on to your nipple instead of the tissue behind your nipple or it could be a positioning problem. My guess is it's something pretty simple that one visit to a lactation expert should solve.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My son is 3 weeks old and nursing very well. I would like to pump so my husband can give him a bottle, but when I do pump, I only get about 2-3 ounces total -- not enough to satisfy my son. Is it possible to pump enough in one sitting to provide enough (about 4 ounces) for my son?


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