TTC: Trying to Conceive

WebMD Live Events Transcript

Are you trying to conceive? Amos Grunebaum, MD, medical director of the WebMD Fertility Center, joined us on July 18, 2005 to answer your questions about getting pregnant.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

MODERATOR:
Hello Dr. Grunebaum. How are you today?

DR. AMOS:
Hello everybody, I am fine, thank you.

MEMBER QUESTION:
We are trying to have a baby. As per my ovulation chart I will ovulate this Thursday. I bought an OPK (ovulation predictor kit) to make sure. When should I start testing?

DR. AMOS:
The OPK usually turns positive within one to two days prior to ovulation, so what you should do is to start testing about four to five days before expected ovulation.

Ovulation usually happens within 12-34 hours after the OPK first turns positive. Some women choose to test every 12 hours, to make sure they won't miss the first positive. However, you really don't want to start making love only for the first time after it turns positive because at that time it may already be too late to optimize getting pregnant. You should make love regularly two to three times a week, every week and in addition, every day during the four to five days leading up to and the day of ovulation.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I wanted to know when it is OK to start TTC (
trying to conceive) after a miscarriage and D&C at 10 weeks. Some doctors say one cycle. What do you recommend?

DR. AMOS:
Ovulation can happen as early as 2 weeks after a miscarriage and studies have shown that there is no increased adverse outcome if you get pregnant early on. But many doctors suggest waiting for at least one period. That ensures that the uterine lining has shed at least once and hopefully improves implantation.

"I always suggest to do an official sperm count in an approved laboratory when you want to know for sure."

MEMBER QUESTION:
Where can women read the research on trying to conceive after a miscarriage? What does the research say about how long it is necessary to wait? What are the risks if you don't wait?

DR. AMOS:
The best research place is PubMed (www.pubmed.com). You can search for publications there and find out the most recent information on an issue.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I am on my third cycle of Clomid and my husband did a home sperm count test. He got a negative on the first test and a positive on the second test four days later. When should he be tested by a doctor? My doctor originally said not until I was on Clomid for six months, assuming I was the only problem.

DR. AMOS:
I am unsure what you mean by positive or negative. A home sperm test is much less reliable than an "official" sperm analysis.

MEMBER:
The test, new on the market, tells you whether the sperm count is over 20 mil (positive) or under (negative).

DR. AMOS:
I always suggest to do an official sperm count in an approved laboratory when you want to know for sure. The total count doesn't tell you enough about his sperms. There is much more information in the sperm analysis than just the count, like mobility and morphology. The home test does not give you that information. Do an "official" sperm analysis and find out for sure.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I'm on my eighth month TTC. My doctor says we need to wait one year before seeing him. Is there someone else we can see? I'm beginning to feel like we're wasting time and that there may be a problem. I experience pains on one side following ovulation. Should this be a concern as well?

DR. AMOS:
If you are ovulating (are you?) then the next step is to do a sperm count. If your doctor told you that she doesn't want to see you until one year there is a solution: find another doctor who is willing to see you earlier.




STAY INFORMED

Get the Latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!