TTC: Trying to Conceive

WebMD Live Events Transcript

Are you trying to conceive? Amos Grunebaum, MD, medical director of the WebMD Fertility Center, joined us on June 13, 2005 to answer your questions about getting pregnant. Whether you are taking the first baby steps toward parenthood or have been trying for a while, come check the discussion.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

MODERATOR:
Welcome Dr. Grunebaum.

DR. AMOS:
Hi.

MODERATOR:
How are you today?

DR. AMOS:
I am well, thank you. I'm a little tired, I was up delivering babies last night, but I'm ready to answer your questions.

MODERATOR:
Let's see what the members are asking about today.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I have a question about timing of ovulation. If my temps have now dropped for two consecutive days, where does that mean I am at as far as ovulation goes?

DR. AMOS:
A dropped temperature usually means nothing at all. When you ovulate your temperature goes up by 0.3 or more degrees and stays up for at least three days. That's called a biphasic curve. So you can only see from a sustained increase that ovulation has happened, not from a drop.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I am 31-years-old and have been trying to conceive for the past four months with no success. I have previously had an ectopic pregnancy which destroyed one tube. The other tube looked fine on the laparotomy. I was wondering how long it could take to get pregnant with just one tube and how long should I go back to my ObGyn if nothing happens. Also, what steps do I take if nothing happens? I seem to be ovulating fine. I have waited for one year for the laparotomy to heal. Will the one-year wait affect my chances of trying to conceive?

DR. AMOS:
Age is usually the major determining factor as well as prior complications. Most doctors will likely suggest that after six months of trying with a history of complications you should see a specialist. Checking his sperm count and the patency of your fallopian tube are usually the next steps if it has been determined that you ovulate regularly. Good luck.

"Unfortunately, with a history of an ectopic there is a significantly increased risk of it happening again and for you to have difficulties getting pregnant."

MEMBER QUESTION:
I recently suffered from an
ectopic pregnancy after trying to conceive for 18 months. We conceived without using assisted reproduction. I have none of the risk factors for ectopic pregnancy -- HPV, smoking, tube problems, etc. Will the ectopic pregnancy hinder my fertility even if my tube was saved? What are the chances that I will have another ectopic pregnancy?

DR. AMOS:
Unfortunately, with a history of an ectopic there is a significantly increased risk of it happening again and for you to have difficulties getting pregnant. The risk is 20 times higher of having another ectopic when compared to someone without that history. That's why it's important for a woman with a prior ectopic to see the doctor as soon as the diagnosis of the next pregnancy is made -- to ensure the pregnancy is now in the right place.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I know it takes the average couple about five to six months to get pregnant. How long does it take the average couple who is charting to get pregnant?

DR. AMOS:
If you ovulate regularly, he has a normal count, and by charting you mean you make love as you should, that means you make love 2-3 times a week every week as well as daily during the 5-6 fertile days, then your chances of getting pregnant are likely significantly improved and it takes a shorter time to get pregnant. Good luck.