Conceive, Trying to (cont.)

DR. AMOS:
I am unsure what you mean by "extremely large". You may want to discuss with your doctor how to measure the clots and maybe show them to your doctor. That's the best way to figure out whether your period bleeding is too heavy or not.

MEMBER QUESTION:
Can HPV or trichomoniasis prevent pregnancy?

DR. AMOS:
Neither HPV (human papilloma virus) nor trichomonas are known to affect your fertility.

"Only a pregnancy test can tell you whether you are pregnant or not. Do one today and find out for sure."

MEMBER QUESTION:
I am 33 years old and have never been pregnant. I discontinued birth control (Depo-Provera) about one month ago and would like to conceive. I understand conception probably won't occur for four to eight months. I take Norvasc and Cozaar for hypertension. My doctor has advised me to inform him as soon as I become pregnant, but are these drugs safe to take while trying to conceive? Please talk a little about pregnancy and hypertension.

DR. AMOS:
It's unclear what you mean by "discontinued Depo-Provera." The important question to answer is: When did you get the last shot? It can take 9-12 months after the last shot for ovulation and your fertility to return to normal again.

As to the hypertension medication, before you stop them I would suggest you see a high-risk obstetrician. This specialist can review your history, assess how important those medications are and then advise you whether to continue taking them or to switch to others. Never stop medication on your own without first discussing it with a doctor.

MEMBER QUESTION:
Could the
stress of unsuccessfully trying to conceive (for a year now) contribute to our failure to conceive?

DR. AMOS:
If you now ovulate normally then stress is unlikely to affect your fertility.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I'm 35 years old and my husband and I have been trying to conceive for about a year. My menstrual cycles have been ranging anywhere between 27 and 38 days. Is this unusual?

DR. AMOS:
You have irregular cycles. Any time your cycles differ by more than 2-3 days, you are considered "irregular." Ovulation makes them regular so with irregular cycles you should first find out if and when you ovulate. That can be done best by keeping a temperature chart at the WebMD Fertility Center. Once you do your chart you can quickly identify whether there is a problem or not.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My son will be 4 years old at the end of July, my daughter would have been 2 this August, and I had no problems getting pregnant with either one. I had my tubes tied right after my daughter was born and I regret it. I had a reversal last June and we have been trying since then. I'm not one to check temps or to check cervical mucus. I guess my question is: is it too soon to think I won't get pregnant after a reversal?

DR. AMOS:
Your chances of getting pregnant depend mostly on whether the surgery was successful. By successful I mean whether your tubes are now open or not. This is usually confirmed with a hysterosalpingogram. If the tubes are open, you ovulate regularly, and he has enough sperms then you have a great chance getting pregnant.

MEMBER QUESTION:
Without going on actual fertility drugs, is there anything that will boost my fertility?

DR. AMOS:
There is a HUGE misconception about "fertility drugs." There are NO "fertility drugs." There are no drugs that make you fertile when you are not. Certain drugs help you ovulate when you are not, but that's about it.

How do you know where the problem is without getting him his sperm count checked? No matter what's wrong or right with you, if his sperm count is too low then you won't get pregnant.

So the questions to answer are: Am I in ovulation, are my tubes open, and does he have enough sperms?

"Clomid is usually the first drug of choice. It makes 50% of women who do ovulate get pregnant within the first three months."

MEMBER QUESTION:
Are there any other ovulation drugs besides Clomid that we can use? I am anovulatory and 29 years old.

DR. AMOS:
Clomid is usually the first drug of choice. It makes 50% of women who do ovulate get pregnant within the first three months. All other drugs are more complicated and often require an injection.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My wife's fallopian tubes are blocked. We are happily married for eight years. Can you advise the best possible treatment, please?



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