TTC: Trying to Conceive

WebMD Live Events Transcript

Are you trying to conceive? Amos Grunebaum, MD, medical director of the WebMD Fertility Center, joined us on May 16, 2005 to answer your questions about getting pregnant.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I have had a luteal phase (LP) of just 10 days for the past two cycles (with spotting for about three days before the start of menses with one cycle). I have only charted for two cycles (and never before this time), so I don't know what my LP has been all along. I do have an almost 3-year-old, so I was able to conceive without any problems once. Does a 10-day LP indicate a luteal-phase defect?

DR. AMOS:
The luteal phase is the time between ovulation and the next period. The normal luteal phase should be at least 12 days, and on average it's about 14 days.

A short luteal phase (LPD -- luteal phase deficiency) can be responsible for problems getting pregnant. That's because the uterine lining needs time to get ready for implantation.

You may want someone else to confirm the short CL phase (corpus luteum phase), and if that's true then you should discuss with your doctor what the next steps should be.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I have had three early losses and am being treated for a clotting disorder with baby aspirin. We have had timed intercourse for six months and I know I am ovulating. Since my last loss (and D & C) my periods have been very heavy, thick and painful. Could this be something that is preventing us from getting pregnant?

DR. AMOS:
A heavy period could sometimes be a first indication of an underlying problem. It could be due to hormonal or uterine problems. The first step would be to identify and make sure exactly if and when you ovulate. Your doctor should examine you and do some tests and see if everything is OK otherwise.

"Any serious medication can affect his sperm count. But only a sperm analysis can tell you for sure."

MEMBER QUESTION:
I have been trying to get pregnant for about seven months now. I am due to start my period around May 22. My husband and I tried every other day during ovulation and now I am having pain, like cramps. They aren't bad, they are just enough to notice and be a nuisance. I'm also kind of tight. Could this mean that I am pregnant or could it be something else?

DR. AMOS:
You may be pregnant but it's much too early to tell; it's only one week or so after ovulation. Only a pregnancy test can tell you for sure. A urine test is usually positive around the time of a missed period.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My husband has been taking medications for Addison's for the past 15 years and I was wondering if they can affect his sperm count and my chances of getting pregnant. He takes
Prednisone (5 milligrams), Synthroid (150 milligrams), and Fludrocort (0.1 milligrams).

DR. AMOS:
Any serious medication can affect his sperm count. But only a sperm analysis can tell you for sure. Why not do it and confirm that he is OK (or not)?

MEMBER QUESTION:
My husband and I just recently started TTC. I'm 19, have endometriosis and PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome). How long should someone in my shoes try for until they should get worried?

DR. AMOS:
These two conditions are very serious and can prevent you from getting pregnant differently. Women with PCOS often don't ovulate, and women with endometriosis have "tubal" problems -- the tubes don't transport the egg and/or sperms properly. With these 2 conditions it's optimal to see a specialist right away and find out how to improve your chances of getting pregnant.



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