The Ordinary Life of an Ordinary Mom

WebMD Live Events Transcript

If you are a mom, you know there is nothing very ordinary about raising kids: the things they say and do range from the ridiculous to the sublime. Humorist Amy Krouse Rosenthal joined us on May 5, 2005 to share her funny take on the ordinary life of an ordinary mom.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

MODERATOR:
Welcome to WebMD Live, Amy. Thank you for joining us today. Who are you a mom to - and how many?

ROSENTHAL:
I am mother to, I believe three children -- the best I can tell from the activity in my house. Justin is 12, Miles is 10 and Paris, she's 8.

MODERATOR:
How's it going? Are you looking forward to Mother's Day or is every day a mother's day?

ROSENTHAL:
Well, I don't know about you, but I definitely don't get some kind of meal in bed, brought up to me by my children, every day. I'm looking forward to some serious hard labor on their part.

MODERATOR:
I'm happy not to get anything burnt in bed myself. Mine kids are past that age. And I did survive.

ROSENTHAL:
How old are your kids?

MODERATOR:
Sara is 21 and Tyler is 17. Safely past the burnt breakfast age and almost past the "can I have some money so I can buy you something" age.

MEMBER QUESTION:
Amy, do your children think you're funny?

ROSENTHAL:
No, they think I'm cheesy. I mean, in that sort of rare moment where the stars are aligned, one of them might be in a good enough mood to say, "Oh, mom, that was really funny," or "That was so corny."

"I wonder if eye rolling at parents is a universal thing in all cultures, like babies in remote tribes in Africa -- are they kind of "whatevering" their parents, as well?"

MODERATOR:
At what age do we become corny to our kids?

ROSENTHAL:
Pretty much out of the womb. I think there's some kind of class in vitro where they teach the fetuses upon arrival to roll their eyes.

I wonder if eye rolling at parents is a universal thing in all cultures, like babies in remote tribes in Africa -- are they kind of "whatevering" their parents, as well?

I think "whatevering" should be a verb.

MODERATOR:
"Whatever" -- the one word I can no longer listen to; I think it's worse than a four-letter word.

ROSENTHAL:
Yes, I'm with you on that. It's the kind of thing where I say, "You can say that to your friends, but you can't say that to me." I have sent many a children up to their room for that.

MODERATOR:
Does your husband share your sense of humor about parenting?

ROSENTHAL:
Yeah. Don't you find in parenting, regardless of who has what personality, who has what job, it's an everyday extension of the good cop, bad cop thing, and you trade roles? You're not always the good cop. Sometimes I'm the good cop, sometimes I'm the bad cop. Sometimes one of us is laughing, the other one is upset. Do you find that to be true?

MODERATOR:
Yes. But want to drive the kids crazy? Both of you stand there and laugh!

MEMBER QUESTION:
What about your kids' friends? Do they find you are very different from their "ordinary" moms?



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