TTC: Trying to Conceive

WebMD Live Events Transcript

Are you trying to conceive? Amos Grunebaum, MD, medical director of the WebMD Fertility Center, joined us on April 11, 2005 to answer your questions about getting pregnant.

The opinions expressed herein are the guests' alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

MODERATOR:
Welcome to TTC: Trying to Conceive with Dr. Amos Grunebaum. On to our first question.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I'm 40 years old, have been TTC for one year and had a trisomy 16 miscarriage. My temperatures are usually from 96.2 to 97.1 preovulation and 97.2 to 97.6 postovulation. I'm also on Clomid 50 milligrams. Are my temperatures especially low or indicative of a problem?

GRUNEBAUM:
In general, it's important to first make sure that you ovulate. A typical ovulation BBT curve shows a biphasic temperature chart.

So if you have a lower temperature during the first two weeks or so and then it goes up and it stays up, then that's called a "biphasic" curve. A biphasic curve means that you did ovulate.

Your temperatures typically rise and stay up about 0.4 or so degrees after ovulation. So it seems that your temperatures are OK, though I really would have to look at the total curve.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I'm 27 years old. I was on Ortho Tri-cyclen for three months but have not taken any since March. Is there a good chance I can become pregnant this month?

GRUNEBAUM:
The birth control prevents you from ovulating. Once you stop the pill, ovulation usually happens within 2-3 months. Once you start ovulating again there is a good chance that you could become pregnant.

I hope that you follow the suggestions and take a daily supplement of folic acid. Folic acid is known to prevent fetal malformations and it's recommended for every woman who is trying to conceive. For folic acid to work, you must start it no later than 1-2 months before conception. Good luck.

"Your fertile days are generally the five days before and the day of ovulation. So with a 28-day cycle, ovulation happens on cycle day15 or so and the fertile days are cycle day10-15. On those days you should make love once a day."

MEMBER QUESTION:
I had my period on March 1, 2005. On March 18, I went off the pill in order to try for baby number three. On March 20, I had what they call "breakthrough" bleeding for about three days. In order to calculate when my next period is due, do I refer to the earliest period or the "breakthrough" period?

GRUNEBAUM:
In general it's recommended to not stop the pill in the middle of your cycle. It seems that's what you did, and that can create many problems.

Spotting and irregular bleeding is one of the problems. It may take several months for ovulation to begin and for your cycle to get regular. An "official" menstrual period is defined as bleeding after ovulation. So the bleeding you saw was not a regular period, just bleeding. Once you ovulate then your regular periods will return.

MEMBER QUESTION:
I've been TTC since last October and I'm really clueless about when the best time is to get pregnant. What do you recommend as the best way to find out when you are most fertile?

GRUNEBAUM:
First you need to write down exactly when your period comes. Your fertile days are generally the five days before and the day of ovulation. So with a 28-day cycle, ovulation happens on cycle day15 or so and the fertile days are cycle day10-15. On those days you should make love once a day.

In general it's also recommended to make love 2-3 times a week, every week. This ensures that you won't miss your fertile periods.




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