Hair Loss? Heads Up, Ladies. Here's Help! (cont.)

MEMBER QUESTION:
My mother has very thin hair, but won't consider a wig. She says everyone will know when she goes from wispy to wavy overnight. Are there ways to be gradual about covering hair loss for those who don't want to be obvious about their new look?

GIBSON:
I manufacture, and so do other people, a top piece that actually clips in that's very thin hair specifically made to look gradual. So what someone would probably say to her is, "Wow, something's different about you, you look so good, but I just don't know what's different."

It comes in three different textures. So for someone that has very thinning hair, you want to get the thinnest topical piece. Nobody will know you're wearing it. They're straight, by the way; they're not wavy. You can curl them if you want, because they're made of human hair. But nobody will know. Trust me.

MEMBER QUESTION:
My wife seems as concerned about her hair loss as she does her chemo treatments and radiation. What can I do to help assure her that I, and others, will still think she's wonderful, no matter how much hair she has?

GIBSON:
First of all, the one fear that goes through a woman's mind is that the man's going to leave. Pointing out all of her other positive attributes without saying anything about the hair is the secret. Thus, building her self-esteem in the interim, so that the hair loss becomes the least important thing she'll end up worrying about. It works every time. And telling her you love her, you adore her, and she's beautiful with or without hair also helps. It is vital.

One more thing that can help is getting personally involved. Now let me explain. When I go out, mind you, all my wigs, "my girls," have names. So if I'm out and my hair may be a little messy, or even if it isn't, my boyfriend will say, "Let me brush the back of Elizabeth," or whoever I'm wearing. The intention here is to join the process, which accomplishes two things. One, she's not feeling so alienated, and two, it takes the pressure off of something being so foreign and being much more innate.

You may want to brush her wig for her. You may want to, after she places the wig on her head, say to her, "Give me the brush for just a second," and even if it doesn't need brushing, fix it for her. And after fixing it, look at her, give her a kiss, and say, "Boy, do you look gorgeous. That's my girl." She'll feel like a million bucks.

MODERATOR:
We are almost out of time. Before we wrap things up for today, do you have any final words for us, Amy?

GIBSON:
Something I always say is, girls, we are more than hair. We are amazing people that are multitasking, and that have an emotional depth that goes far beyond the external. Hair loss is more common than you think. You're not alone, and when you decide, "This is what I'm dealing with," you look at it realistically, you don't go into denial, and decide at that point to be proactive. You will go from feeling like a victim to feeling victorious.

I really hope I was able to alleviate some of your stress. Again, call me if you need to. Set up an appointment. I'll be happy to help you. Crown and Glory Enterprises can be reached at (310) 859-6906 or toll free at 1-877-FOR-WIGS. Hair loss can be devastating, but you can live a normal life with it.

MODERATOR:
Our thanks to Amy Gibson for joining us. For more information on Amy's radio show, Heads Up! please visit www.crownandgloryenterprises.com.

WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.