Better Sleep on Business Trips (cont.)

In-Flight

Long flights, poor seating, flight delays, turbulence, missed connections, recycled dry air, and the occasional rude or incessantly talking seatmate can all make for a less-than-pleasant experience. Here are few things you can do to help:

  • Get comfortable. Get a pillow or two and blanket. Bringing along a C-shaped pillow that fits around your neck is also helpful, as it keeps your head from bobbing around or getting a stiff neck. Take off your shoes or at least loosen the laces to improve circulation.
  • Drink water. This will help counter the dehydrating effects of the dry, recycled air. Carbonated beverages may produce excess stomach gas.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine. They are diuretics, causing you to go to the bathroom frequently. This, along with the dry cabin air, will increase your chances of dehydration. Remember that one drink in the air can be act like two on the ground.
  • Relieve ear pressure. First, never fly with serious sinus/ear congestion, whether from a cold, allergy, or upper respiratory infection. If you do, you may experience severe pain and damage your eardrums. To get on the plane, you must be able to "clear" your ears by gently but forcefully exhaling against a closed mouth and nose. Antihistamines and decongestants may significantly help. While on the plane, chewing gum may help equalize your ear pressure as well. Pressure problems are generally worse on landing. So make sure your ears feel clear before you descend.
  • Nap carefully. Consider a short nap on a short flight and a longer one on a longer flight. On longer flights consider waiting until the latter portion of the flight. So when you wake and feel refreshed just as the flight as about to end. Do not snooze too long unless you have a long flight. Napping more than 30-45 minutes may put you into a deep sleep, making you feel more tired when you wake up. Also, close the window shade, if possible, or don your eye covers. Ear plugs will also help a great deal.

At the Hotel

Sleeping facilities are as important as meeting facilities.

When booking a hotel, ask for a room away from the ballroom nightclub, bar, or restaurant. If you are not with your family try to stay away from others with babies or small kids. And, above all, make sure the alarm clock in the room isn't already set to go off when you don't want it to.

Some hotels are now promoting sleep-friendly amenities. The Hilton Hotel chain commissioned the Alertness Solutions study noted above to incorporate the findings into their offerings. The Westin offers its Heavenly Bed for a good night's rest. The Benjamin Hotel in New York is all about sleep, and Crowne Plaza Hotels & Resorts is launching its Sleep Advantage Program next month. These hotels might provide:

  • Designated quiet areas: These are rooms or whole floors that are explicitly reserved for customers who want a good night's sleep, and may have certain restrictions against children, loud music, parties, etc.
  • Quiet rooms: These rooms may be located well off the street, have double-paned windows, soundproofed non-squeaky doors, quiet air-conditioners, and the like.
  • Room amenities: These make a big difference and can include:
    • A great bed and bedding
    • Ear plugs and eye covers
    • Blackout curtains
    • Relaxing, sleep-promoting music
    • Night lights for safety and avoiding bright light if you get up at night
    • Bath amenities such as lavender aromatherapy, potpourri, soaps, and oils
    • Menu of pillows, from down to full-body and C-pillows
    • Wake-up calls
  • Spa facilities: They may include steam, sauna, aromatherapy, exercise equipment, and massage to help guests relax.