Abs: Striving for Those Six-Pack Abs (cont.)

Cardiovascular conditioning, whether it's running, walking, or taking a cycling or dance class, can help burn calories. Combined with a balanced diet, aerobic exercise helps you lose the fat built up above the muscle.

Experts agree that the combination of a healthful, nutritious diet and cardiovascular exercise are needed to train your abdominal muscles.

Ab Workout: More Is Not Better

"You're not going to reduce fat content without either a whole heck of a lot of abdominal work -- which is unnecessary and a waste of time -- or some kind of aerobic activity," says Richard Cotton, exercise physiologist and spokesman for the American Council on Exercise (ACE).

Abdominal muscles consist of three layers. The very deepest layer is the transversus abdominis, which acts as the body's girdle, providing support and stability and plays a critical role in exhalation. Next is the rectus abdominis, which flexes the spine. Closest to the surface are the internal and external obliques, which turn the trunk and provide the body with rotation and lateral movement.

Exercise physiologist and certified diabetes expert Rich Weil recommends training the abdominals much the way you would any other part of the body.

"Abdominal muscles are no different than any other muscle group. They should respond the same way." Hence, if you wouldn't do 50 bicep curls, you don't need to do 50 abdominal crunches, he says. Just work smarter by slowingdown to try to isolate the muscles you're working.

Six-Pack Abs: Reality or Pipe Dream?

So what about the six-pack? Is it attainable? Can anyone get it?

Although possible, most experts say it's rare.

"Six-pack abs is really a pre-cellulite phenomenon. It tends to be reserved for those in their teens and 20s," says Cotton. "It gets more difficult as we age because we get more subcutaneous body fat." However, with the right genetics and strict program, even people in their 30s and 40s can have six-pack abs.

Genetically, women have a disadvantage when it comes to that. Their bodies store more fat than men. For good reason, says Calabrese. Women's bodies are designed to bear and nourish babies and fat is the primary energy source to support fetal development. In addition, Calabrese says, men generally lose weight quicker as a result of regular exercise.

For women to lower body fat enough to have a six-pack, says Cotton, "that might even interrupt their menstrual cycle."

That's why Cotton doesn't encourage such extreme goals.

"I personally think it's on the order of ridiculous," he says. "If you're spending that much time on your abs, you're wasting time and taking time away from other muscle groups. It's a show muscle.

"When I have clients that are obsessed with that, I work on values and self-acceptance. People want a perfect body, they want a Lexus and they want a 3,000 square foot home. They're objectifying the body."