Feature Archive

Pain and Multiple Sclerosis

Many options are available to treat pain in patients with multiple sclerosis.

By Gina Shaw
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario

When most people think of multiple sclerosis, they think of a disease that causes symptoms of weakness and motor problems -- not pain.

"About 10 or 20 years ago, there was a saying that MS causes all kinds of trouble but doesn't cause pain, which really isn't true," says Francois Bethoux, MD, director of rehabilitation services at the Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research at The Cleveland Clinic.

"In a national survey of more than 7,000 MS patients, 70% of them had experienced some kind of pain, and at least 50% were experiencing some kind of pain at the time of the survey," Bethoux says.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society reports that almost half of all people with MS are troubled by chronic pain.

MS pain differs from the kind of pain you might get with a headache, a joint injury, or muscle strain. "It's often more diffuse, affecting several areas of the body at a time. It often changes over time, getting worse or better for no apparent reason. It tends to fluctuate a lot," says Bethoux. "People often find it hard to describe: It's sometimes described as like a toothache, other times like a burning pain, and sometimes as a very intense sensation of pressure. It's very distressing for patients because they have a hard time explaining what their pain experience is."

So what's causing this baffling, complex, often debilitating pain? Bethoux describes it as "an illusion created by the nervous system." Normally, he explains, the nervous system sends pain signals as a warning phenomenon when something harmful happens to the body. "It's a natural defense mechanism telling us to avoid what's causing the pain," he says. "But in MS, the nerves are too active and they send pain signals with no good reason -- they're firing a pain message when they shouldn't be."