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Treating Hair Loss Naturally

Experts say vitamins, herbs, even diet can help women cope with hair loss

WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Charlotte Grayson

It's been called the "ultimate bad hair day" -- the moment a woman realizes that her sink contains a lot more than just the few strands she's used to seeing following a shampoo or even a vigorous brushing. The problem is hair loss, and whether the result of the aging process or a true medical or genetic condition, the number of women affected appears to be on the rise.

While there are certainly a number of specific medical treatments that offer great results, depending on the cause of the hair loss , and the extent, experts say there are a variety of natural treatments that can yield important benefits for anyone concerned about the health of their hair. Among the first natural lines of defense: Eating a healthy, nutritious diet.

Eating for Hair Health

"The same foods that are good for your body and your health overall are good for your hair, including foods that are high in protein, low in carbohydrates and have a reduced fat content," says dermatologist Michael Reed, MD, an expert in female hair loss at New York University Medical Center in New York City. Reed says that what you put on your plate may not put hair on your head, but it can help the hair you do have remain healthier longer.

Another important dietary need are essential fatty acids, found in foods like walnuts, canola oil, fish, and soy.