Fitness Programs That Fit

Personal Trainers, Videos, Can Get You Going On Your Own Fitness Program

By Jeanie Lerche Davis
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic - Feature

Reviewed By Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD, LD

Just do it, we hear. Do what?, we whine. Getting off your you-know-what is a tough hurdle. Even exercise experts admit fitness programs can be boring. Here's their advice for starting a fitness program -- and sticking with it.

Before you start, get real with yourself, says Gregory Florez, a personal trainer and spokesman for the American Council on Exercise (ACE).

"Look yourself in the mirror. If you can't picture yourself getting on that treadmill or stationary bike or going to that fitness club three times a week, don't do it," he tells WebMD. "Don't buy machines you aren't going to use. Don't join a gym if you're not going to feel comfortable going."

Then, get some professional advice on fitness programs, he advises. "You must have a plan that takes into consideration not only your goals but also your barriers, both real and perceived. Even if you are on a limited budget, you should get some beginning advice from a certified personal trainer." The cost ranges from $35 to $100 per hourly session.

No way, you say? Then find a few good videos on fitness programs, Florez suggests. There are lots of them out there.

Core Curriculum

Aerobics, strength training, flexibility/balance training -- these are the components of any good fitness program, for people at any age and fitness level, explains Sal Fichera, MS, an exercise physiologist in New York City and also an ACE spokesman.