Feature Archive

When Heartburn Gets Serious

Ignoring heartburn -- just putting up with it, popping a few pills day after day -- isn't necessarily the best plan. There are complications that can result from letting the problem linger.

By Jeanie Lerche Davis
WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Cynthia Haines

Ignoring heartburn -- just putting up with it, popping a few pills day after day -- isn't necessarily the best plan. There are complications that can result from letting the problem linger.

"When heartburn is not appropriately treated, acid reflux can cause erosion and ulcers in the lining of the esophagus," says William C. Orr, PhD, a clinical professor of medicine and specialist in gastrointestinal disorders at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

"It's extremely painful and greatly affects the patient's lifestyle," he tells WebMD. "It really alters very significantly the quality of life."

Long-term acid reflux can cause scarring and narrowing in the esophagus, which can also lead to swallowing difficulties, Radhika Srinivasan, MD, a gastrointestinal specialist and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, tells WebMD.

This condition, called esophageal strictures, can interfere with eating and drinking by preventing food and liquid from reaching the stomach. Strictures are treated by dilation, in which an instrument gently stretches the strictures and expands the opening in the esophagus.