Nutrition: Burgers, Slaw -- and Salmonella (cont.)

"On the Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, and the Labor Day weekends you can be sure we'll have several outbreaks of food poisoning," says Patricia Quinlisk, MD, state epidemiologist and medical director for the Iowa Department of Public Health. She was called in to help with the investigation of the Oskaloosa outbreak, and every summer she and her colleagues watch for "blips" -- food poisoning outbreaks -- over the holiday weekends.

Quinlisk offers plenty of reasons why the problem heats up in summer. "People aren't as careful about handling foods properly when they cook and eat outside, and they don't always have access to warm water and soap for washing." But during the summer, precautions are most important because the hot and humid weather promotes the growth of bacteria -- the source of most forms of food poisoning.

Potato salad, turkey sandwiches, or other foods left out in the sun can all become hotbeds of bacteria. This happens more often during outdoor picnics and gatherings, where it's more difficult to keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot -- temperatures at which bacteria are less of a threat.

So serious is the problem that the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will soon release food safety tips as part of the recently revised Dietary Guidelines for Americans. "This is an important step in changing the way we think about food safety," says Johanna Dwyer, a Tufts University professor and member of the advisory committee that is drawing up the new guidelines. "The 'Keep Food Safe to Eat' guidelines will focus on ways to avoid trouble in our own kitchens."

And although the guidelines have not yet been officially released, experts agree that these four simple food-handling tips can go a long way toward reducing your risk of food poisoning this summer:

  • Lather up: Hand washing is the single most effective way to prevent food-related illness. Always wash your hands before preparing food and after using the bathroom or changing diapers. Antibacterial hand sanitizers are no substitute for soap. Analyses indicate that warm water and soap get rid of about 95% of the bacteria; antibacterial gels and towels eliminate only about 5%.

    Wash fresh fruits and vegetables thoroughly in cold water to rinse off any microorganisms that may lurk on them. Sponges can harbor battalions of nasty microbes. Experts recommend microwaving sponges for 15 to 30 seconds every few days to disinfect them (but be careful because they will be very hot).

  • Divide and conquer: Cross-contamination during preparation, grilling, and serving food is a prime cause of food-related illness. Don't let raw meat or poultry juices drip onto other foods when you're grocery shopping, or in the refrigerator or ice chest. Don't use the same cutting board, platter, or utensils for raw meat as for other raw or cooked foods. And keep your cooking surfaces clean by sanitizing them with a solution of one tablespoon household bleach in a gallon of water.