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What Dads Expect When They're Expecting

What Dad's Expect When Mom is Expecting

WebMD Feature

When Simon D'Arcy's wife, Sharon, got pregnant, so did he. He didn't have morning sickness, mood swings or a growing belly, but the transformation he faced was just as intense, and it took him the full nine months to prepare.

"The whole thing is so huge -- emotionally, psychologically, physically, spiritually. I don't think there's a larger identity change for a man, or for a woman, for that matter," says D'Arcy, a management consultant in Santa Barbara, Calif. "It just doesn't get the same attention because we're not the ones gaining 30 pounds and throwing up."

A new generation of fathers is being born. Gone are the legendary souls who paced hospital waiting rooms, cigars in hand, and -- heaven forbid -- changed a solitary diaper over the course of a weekend. Like D'Arcy, these dads want to be involved, not just with the birth, but afterward.

Breaking new ground isn't easy, of course. But there are plenty of dads like D'Arcy to prove it can be done. Becoming fathers in the new millennium means stretching beyond comfort zones, finding role models for support and encouragement, and not settling for those lingering myths about fatherhood.

Myth No. 1: Pregnancy Is Just a Chick Thing