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Doing Battle With Morning Sickness

Doing Battle with Morning Sickness

WebMD Feature

Nothing can blast the euphoria of discovering you're pregnant faster than morning sickness. For Deborah Wood, a mother of three and writer in Evanston, Ill., certain smells were killers, especially with her first pregnancy. In fact, opening a refrigerator became an occupational hazard. Just the mention of tuna -- a food she normally loves -- would make her heave. She even started carrying plastic grocery bags in her pockets for those times when a mad dash to the bathroom was impossible.

She's not alone. As many as 90% of all pregnant women experience some degree of nausea or vomiting during pregnancy, says Dr. Jennifer Niebyl, head of obstetrics and gynecology at University of Iowa College of Medicine. In most cases, the symptoms are associated with a perfectly healthy baby, and they disappear by the fourth month. But some women have the symptoms longer, even lasting their whole pregnancy.

The trick is finding out what helps, although that's often easier said than done. Not only is every woman different, but so is each pregnancy. "There isn't a one-size-fits-all remedy," says Miriam Erick, a registered dietician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and author of "No More Morning Sickness: A Survival Guide for Pregnant Women" and "Take Two Crackers and Call Me in the Morning."