Feature Archive

How to Get Your Kids to Behave

Surprise. You might first have to change your own behavior.

WebMD Feature

Reviewed By Gary Vogin I am no Captain von Trapp and yet, as the mother of 21-month-old twins, there lurks within me a certain envy of how the "Sound of Music" patriarch managed his brood. In the movie's party scene, his seven neatly outfitted children serenade a charmed group of guests, then march off to their rooms for bed. My kids are too young to march and just last week they mutinied out of their high chairs, climbed onto the kitchen table, and flung around wads of raisin toast, without so much as a chorus of "My Favorite Things." Stunned, overwhelmed, and prematurely fatigued, I was left once again to consider my disciplinary failings.

And that may have been my first mistake.

According to a new breed of discipline experts, parents who flail themselves for not being able to control their toddlers and make them do what they should do, for heaven's sake, might be better off taking a fresh look at the whole parent-child dynamic. Forget about time-outs, they say, forget about punishment entirely. These experts advocate no begging, no manipulation, no threats, no giving up -- and they're not talking about the kids, they're talking about how the parents behave. That's the gist of this more gentle approach to discipline: if parents can teach themselves to act assertively, kindly, and responsibly, they have a good chance of teaching their children to do the same.