Feature Archive

Stroke: The Silent Killer

Too many people die from it. Here's how to reduce the risk.

WebMD Feature

April 17, 2000 (Great Falls, Mont.) -- The numbers are startling: Every 53 seconds someone in the United States suffers a stroke, and someone dies from one every 3.3 minutes. Strokes afflict a half million people each year, killing about a third of them and disabling another 200,000, according to the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

Right now, three million survivors are living with the life-altering consequences of strokes, including Connie Bentley of Portland, Ore. A cardiologist prescribed medication for her high blood pressure 10 years ago, but because the pills made her sleepy, she stopped taking them. After all, Bentley, now aged 49, was in peak shape at the time: She lifted weights three days a week and ran four miles on alternate days.

"I didn't think I needed medication because I was staying healthy by exercising," says Bentley. So she told herself she could quit the medicine, at least for now, and perhaps resume it in her 50s or 60s when she might not be able to exercise as intensely. Then, two years ago, she suffered a stroke that paralyzed her left arm and leg. Since then, she has learned to walk again, and now lifts light weights.

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