Feature Archive

On-the-Job

Are workers paying a high price for productivity?

WebMD Feature

Feb. 21, 2000 (Washington) -- For most of his nearly nine years as a worker in a chicken slaughterhouse in Harbeson, Del., Walter Frazier outperformed everyone around him. About 10,000 times a day he would take a live, often reluctant chicken off the conveyor belt in front of him and hang it by its feet on a line over his head; from there it would be carried to the kill room.

His co-workers saw it as a thankless job, one they did everything to avoid. But Frazier talks with pride of hanging as many as 26 birds in a minute -- "I was a leader in there" -- and showing younger workers what a hard day's labor involved.

But Frazier has paid a high price for his productivity. Three times in the past two years he has had surgery to repair cysts and other injuries in his wrists and hands -- damaged, his doctors say, by the repetitive motion his job required. He also has severe arthritis in his shoulders and hands, along with lower back pain.

Frazier's case is well known to officials of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) -- so much so that this past November, when the agency proposed new regulations aimed at preventing such injuries, they invited him to speak at the Washington, D.C., press conference. After eight years of political battles, OSHA unveiled a standard that would require many employers to institute workplace ergonomics programs, which, depending on circumstances, will range from performing employee education to modifying job tasks to providing different workstations or equipment. The goal is to stem the rising tide of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including those known as repetitive stress or repetitive strain injuries, that account for one third of all occupational injuries reported to the Bureau of Labor Statistics each year.