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Getting Your Tubes Tied

Is this common procedure causing uncommon problems?

WebMD Feature

May 1, 2000 (Portland, Ore.) -- When Susan Belcher of Lockport, Ill., had her tubes tied at age 34, she thought the procedure would be simple. She signed a consent form before the surgery and was told by her doctor that she should expect to have few -- if any -- side effects. However, following the surgery, she stopped having her periods. In fact, at the age of 36, she was diagnosed as postmenopausal. Belcher's doctor says she'll need to be on hormone replacement therapy for the rest of her life. "If someone had told me that the surgery could create a hormone imbalance, I never would have done it," she says.

In the United States, about 10 million women have had their tubes tied -- a procedure called tubal ligation -- as a permanent form of birth control since the 1960s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics. This makes it the second most popular method after oral contraceptives, according to the CDC.

The exact number of women who, like Belcher, claim to have post-tubal ligation syndrome -- a range of symptoms including hot flashes, heavier periods, mood swings, depression, anxiety, insomnia, vaginal dryness, mental confusion, and fatigue -- has not been studied, though the syndrome has been a popular topic in Internet chat rooms and support groups. On the other hand, many women report no such symptoms after the surgery.

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