Feature Archive

Pap Technology

New techniques can better detect cervical problems.

WebMD Feature Women have been going to their gynecologists for Pap tests for more than 50 years. And their vigilance has paid off: Mortality rates from cervical cancer have dropped 70%, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. But a woman's chance of getting a false negative -- a result that says she's healthy when she really has cancer or pre-cancerous cells -- is still between 10 and 25%, according to the ACOG.

Hoping to improve those odds, manufacturers have introduced several new methods that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These new methods -- whose brand names include Papnet, Autopap and ThinPrep -- use computers to help analyze slides.

Luis Galup, a pathologist at the South Bend Medical Foundation in South Bend, Ind., is a strong advocate of the ThinPrep system. Instead of smudging a slide with cells scraped from a woman's cervix -- the conventional method -- the cells are swirled into a tube filled with a preservative and sent to a lab. In the lab, technicians filter out the blood, mucus, and other debris. A random sample of the fluid is then placed onto a slide.

Easier-to-Read Samples

According to Galup, ThinPrep's method of collection keeps the collected cells from drying out, which results in a more uniform, debris-free sample. "It's so much easier to read," Galup says. An important advantage, he adds, is that the same ThinPrep fluid can be used to test for human papillomavirus, or HPV, which is associated with cervical cancer.