Feature Archive

Searching for Sex Therapy

The best way to find professional help for your own sex life.

WebMD Feature

If the thrill has completely deserted your sex life, your performance flags repeatedly, or your appreciation for porno movies exceeds your interest in being intimate with your partner, it might be time to consider some sessions with a sex therapist.

While lack of desire -- which can take many forms -- is one of the most common reasons to seek sexual counseling, it is far from the only one. If you think you have a sexual problem or are seriously dissatisfied with your intimate experiences, a therapist who specializes in sexuality can serve as a shortcut to the heart of the matter.

There are a number of ways to find a good sex therapist.

First ask those in the counseling business whose professional ethics usually guarantee confidentiality: a pastor, for instance, or a current or former general therapist, or a physician.

A physician may be the best place to start, because a sexual problem could stem from a physical condition or a drug side effect. Having a medical evaluation first to rule out physical causes for your sexual problems can save you time and minimize angst.

Other sources for sex-therapist recommendations include medical and psychological organizations, such as county medical associations. Or, if you really want privacy, go on the Internet and type in "sex therapist'' to find one via a search engine. There are private, legitimate counselors who conduct online sexual therapy.