Feature Archive

Working Your Back

How good is Pilates?

WebMD Feature

July 31, 2000 -- I'm lying on the floor of a sunny, sparsely decorated studio in San Francisco, my spine centered along the top of a large white Styrofoam tube. Under the watchful eye of my instructor, Kim Deterline, I raise one leg at a time off the ground, all the while concentrating on keeping my stomach pulled in and my spine neither perfectly flat nor overly arched. As I struggle to stay balanced atop the tube, the muscles in my torso begin to burn and tighten.

It's not easy, and it doesn't bring the aerobic rush of a quick swim or a mind-clearing run, but I'm hoping it will benefit my back. At the ripe old age of 25, I've had two back surgeries and ingested more ibuprofen than I care to admit. So I'm always on the prowl for exercises that will strengthen my spine without causing further injury.

Pilates (pronounced pih-LAH-teez), the fitness regimen I've come to the studio to learn, promises to do just that. It's a series of slow, precise movements that target your "core muscles" -- abdominals, lower back, thighs, and buttocks. Strengthen these critical areas, devotees say, and you'll be rewarded with a leaner midsection, a healthier back, and more graceful movements.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors