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How Families Can Cope with Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

By Ronald Pies
WebMD Feature

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by gross distortion of reality, language disturbances, fragmentation of thought and other troubling symptoms. The cost of caring for schizophrenic patients comes to more than $17 billion per year in this country -- but this figure can never capture the emotional cost borne by patients and their families. While schizophrenia is often made worse by stress, it is not caused by bad parenting, "cold" or over-involved mothers, or any other known psychological factor. Rather, schizophrenia probably stems from a combination of genetic factors, biochemical abnormalities in the brain and perhaps very early damage to the developing fetus. Nevertheless, emotional stress -- including pressure from well-meaning family members -- can make the illness worse. What can families do to help their schizophrenic relatives, and to cope with this devastating illness?

Education is certainly paramount. Many parents still blame themselves for causing their son's or daughter's illness; others accuse the afflicted family member of laziness or self-indulgence. This sort of assigning blame is founded in error, and can make matters worse for the individual with schizophrenia. For example, when a family member tells the sufferer, "You don't need those lousy medications! You need to pull yourself together and get a job!" he or she may mean well, but may actually do more harm than good. Individuals with schizophrenia virtually always need to take antipsychotic medication -- they cannot "pull themselves up by their bootstraps" through an act of will.

On the other hand, babying or coddling a family member with schizophrenia is also unhelpful. There is a realistic middle ground that can be reached through family education and support. This can come from mental-health professionals, mental-health advocacy groups and from patients themselves.