Feature Archive

Heady Over Grapes?

Can the seeds heal?

WebMD Feature

Sept. 11, 2000 -- At 42, Linda Walsh of Buena Park, Calif., could hardly believe that age spots were spreading up her shins and down her feet. To make matters worse, her hair was beginning to fall out, her joints were becoming stiffer by the day, and fatigue weighed every step she took.

Then she discovered grape-seed extract.

Now, four years later, Walsh's skin is free of blemishes, her hair is lustrous and full, and there's a new bounce in her stride. "I feel good and I look five years younger than before," she says. For this transformation, Walsh gives credit to an extract taken from the seeds of ordinary grapes. She's so enthusiastic that she now sells the extract and other supplements full time.

Indeed, glowing testimonials from people like Walsh have made grape-seed extract one of the most popular supplements in the United States. In 1999, Americans spent $141 million on grape-seed products, a jump of 26% over the previous year, according to The Hartman Group, a market research firm.

So do grape seeds really work? The question is far from settled, but scientists aren't ready to rule out the possibility that they might. The key ingredient in grape seeds has shown promise against disease-causing chemicals in test tubes. And a few preliminary experiments in humans have produced intriguing results.

Super-Antioxidant

One reason it's not easy to weigh the claims for grape-seed extract is that much of the research is done by people with a stake in selling it. Many of the studies most often cited come from the laboratory of Debasis Bagchi, PhD, a Creighton University professor of pharmaceutical and administrative sciences who also works for grape-seed product maker InterHealth Nutraceuticals.