Feature Archive

Herbs for Diabetes

Are supplements safe?

WebMD Feature

July 31, 2000 -- When 40-something Jeff Cottingham was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, his doctor immediately started him on drugs to control his blood sugar. But Cottingham worried.

Some drugs for diabetes can have dangerous side effects. In a striking example, on March 21, 2000, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed one of the most widely prescribed diabetes drugs, Rezulin (troglitazone), from the market after it was linked to 90 cases of liver failure and 63 deaths.

Already concerned about such problems two years ago, the Aptos, Calif., resident began taking Sweet Eze, a mixture of herbs and minerals sold for diabetes. The supplement seemed to work wonders for the self-described "old hippie."

His level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) -- a protein that reflects blood glucose levels over the past two to three months -- plummeted from 11 to well below the danger threshold of 6. "I feel great," says Cottingham, who has experienced no side effects from the supplement. "I'm completely off diabetes medications now."

A success story? Perhaps. But experts advise caution. For one thing, because Sweet Eze contains six different ingredients -- and because the severity of diabetes symptoms can fluctuate on their own -- it's hard to say what exactly is responsible for Cottingham's improvement. For another, supplements carry their own risks. Some products don't contain the ingredients listed on their labels. Others come mixed with dangerous -- and unlisted -- ingredients. And scientists are just beginning to verify which ones actually work.