Feature Archive

The Green Pharmacist

What should you look for in a pharmacist?

By Lynda Liu
WebMD Feature

When you talk to a pharmacist in a drugstore, you can be pretty confident you're dealing with a professional who has taken rigorous courses on the medicines he or she sells. But when you're looking for herbal remedies, the situation's different. The clerk at the counter of a health food store is probably just as willing to give you advice. But many such employees know little about the uses -- and risks -- of the herbs they sell.

An informal WebMD survey of health store clerks found that their training ranged from a 12-week course to none at all. That's typical of those who sell herbs, says Mindy Green, a founder of the American Herbalists Guild.

It's a problem because herbs, if used improperly, can be dangerous or even lethal. And guidance about what and what not to use can be hard to come by. Many labels on herbal products don't even specify the maladies for which they should be used. And commercially manufactured herbs are often sold mixed with other ingredients in concentrations that can vary widely from one product to another -- making it even more difficult to determine the right product for a given ailment.

Credentials

So where can you get advice you can trust? The closest equivalents to pharmacists in the herb industry are professional herbalists who have spent years studying and using the plant products they prescribe. But while pharmacists and doctors must meet a uniform set of licensing requirements set by a governing board, no such governing body certifies herbalists. This means that checking the credentials of an herbalist may take a little digging, but it's important to do so.